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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, thanks to Jim and the LCS for organizing the SCCA driver's school which enabled us to proceed to get an SCCA license. The driver's school gave us 2 events, and we need 4 total events to get our license.

Robb and I signed up for the SCCA dbl regional at Buttonwillow this past weekend in order to complete and attain our SCCA license. Robb ran a Legends car, and I ran my SRF. I completed both my races on sat. and sun....got my license!

Robb, on the other hand, had some issues with the Legends car....I'll let him tell the story - it's pretty incredible.

Also, Happy Early Birthday Robb - the best gifts are given from generous hearts!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:clap:

Congrats! More importantly... was it fun? :evil:
Robb and I had a blast!

It was fun to meet all sorts of different racers out there, and of course w2w is so much fun!

Btw, it's Robb's bday today - how old are you 39? :p
Robb where are you?
 

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Very cool! Happy B-day Robb!

So what did you think about SCCA events in general. Enough track time? The racers respectful and competent on track? Did you like the SRF?
 

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Thanks Guys!

33 Eddie!! Don't push it!:thwack:

that was a great event,
I could not have got my license without the extraordinary generosity of Tim Meyer, a racer in Spec 944.
He unselfishly gave me his car to use so that I could get licensed and would not take no for an answer OR any money.

I had no option but to go out and WIN the spec 944 class!!

new car and new track so I didn't even know I had it in me!

I like spec racing and enjoyed the SCCA event, not a lot of track time (especially nothing like LCS) but good people and great racing. No real bumping on purpose as everyone was really civilized.
 

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i hear only good things about spec 944.
you are correct(look at my signature)

Tim Meyer is one class act.

I have seen selfless acts like his on a number of occasions in the 944 group here in AZ(where Tim has raced as well as gives his time as an instructor at the race school).

This stuff is why i enjoy racing so much,...........the people in the group are amazing.

congrats robb, and way to be Tim!!!!!

as for the 944 cars, i just picked up a spare car to disassmble for spare parts that came right off the street, running strong for $1,500.
yes, good motor/gearbox, suspension to work with for my current car as backup for $1,500. cant beat the value or competition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Very cool! Happy B-day Robb!

So what did you think about SCCA events in general. Enough track time? The racers respectful and competent on track? Did you like the SRF?
SCCA events and officials are very well run and very nice and helpful. This particular event was pretty crowded because of the 40th Formula birthday, so I was jammed in races with way faster FF's.

The schedule itself does not give a lot of track time:

Sat - 1) 15 min. practice
2) 15 min. qualifying
3) 30 min. race
Sun - 1) 25 min. practice and qualifying
2) 30 min. race

Not a lot of track time, but you meet some great people, great racers, and some real grass roots guys that have been racing for longer than I have lived. There was an SRF driver that was 74 yrs. old! (and I lost to him!)

The SRF for me is an eye-opening car with a steep learning curve. Since it has no HP, I am forced to be super smooth. If I blow a corner, there ain't no tq/hp to save me, and I lose all exit speed.
It is very humbling - I finished pretty much last in both races...but I know it will just take seat time, seat time, seat time.
I have realized though that learning from this slow momentum car will only make me faster in higher hp cars later....it will take time.

Glen, you need to get out and race with us at an SCCA event - the next one is on June 6th at Cal speedway - double regional...perfect opportunity to get your race license!
 

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to address Eddies post above, and the comparison to other offerings.

SCCA racing, and all W2W racing that i have done is not so much about "how much track time", but about the racing.

I have learned(and am still learning) to save my car and not go run every lap of every session prior to the race. i want to save my tires, my car, and myself for the "main event" the W2W racing session.

there is a guy here who schools me every time out in my 944. he runs 4-5 laps in qualifying, thats it, he gets in his fast laps, and saves his car/tires for the main event. he will do the 1st practice session for only a few laps also just to go out and verfiy that his cars works, and is set up how he wants it, then come in, not doing much of the total session time.
when you look at it in these terms, 15 minutes is more than adequite to "test your car", 15 minutes is enough to put down a good lap before you tires overheat, and 30 minutes is a long time when you are focused on the racing.

I used to complain about "not enough track time", until i really understood the idea behind what the racing and the sessions prior are for.

SCCA is all about racing, and not so much "how much track time" did you get.

I prefer quality time(competitive racing), over quantity(doing laps on the track).
the competiton is much more exciting to me than the practice time on the track, and is what i go for.
It is hard to be disciplined and not do every lap of every session though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I agree with the above....the fast guys in my group run very few laps in qualifying to put down a good time, then save tires. They are the consistent ones.

Now, a beginner like me - well, I need all the seat time I can get. But, where I really practice lap after lap is on open test days. There are open test days at Buttonwillow once or twice a month (usually Fridays), and it's $200 to run the whole day (usually alternating 2 sessions - closed wheel and open wheel)....that is a ton of track time.
 

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Glen, you need to get out and race with us at an SCCA event - the next one is on June 6th at Cal speedway - double regional...perfect opportunity to get your race license!
I should and I might just do that. I do want to meet the licensing requirements for SCCA, but my car doesn't fit into any class that I know of. T2 wont allow aero or engine mods and I'll get creamed in any GT class where the Cup cars run. But that may be alright if all I'm going after is the license. The question would then become what to do with the license given the car I have and really enjoy. As if I don't have enough pressure to get another car!

Interesting you say the SRF is low hp. The seem to get better laptimes than Lotuses don't they. What were you laptimes?
 

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I should and I might just do that. I do want to meet the licensing requirements for SCCA, but my car doesn't fit into any class that I know of. T2 wont allow aero or engine mods and I'll get creamed in any GT class where the Cup cars run. But that may be alright if all I'm going after is the license. The question would then become what to do with the license given the car I have and really enjoy. As if I don't have enough pressure to get another car!

Interesting you say the SRF is low hp. The seem to get better laptimes than Lotuses don't they. What were you laptimes?
the better lap times are because of lower weight, lower center of gravity, slicks, and its a purpose built race car, not to mention much more durable.

many people do not have the desire to start out with the good choice of track cars and go small motor. I was at an event last time where they did HPDE, and this guy had been crashed into in level 2. he was pissing and moaning about his car, and that he was going to buy a BMW M35 or something, and I suggested that he buy something cheap, and low HP to learn with. he said "no way, not enough power for me". he will flounder at the HPDE 2 level for a long time because he will never learn about conserving momentum and going fast(unless he hires a coach and listens to the coach)

High HP masks driver defficiancies. when guys are fast in cars with smaller motors, they are usually then able to be fast in all cars, not so when guys who go from high HP car, then move into low HP cars because they are not used to working on conserving their momentum on corner exits.

20 years ago when i started motorcycle roadracing I had to have a
GSXR750, I was OK on it, but it was not until I got a FRZ400 that i learned about momentum, and how mistakes could not be made up for by simply gassing it on the straights. those lessons i keep with me today in my car racing.
Spec miata, Spec racer ford, formula ford, are all good choices to learn how to be fast in any car. racing W2W in these will also teach you because you can gauge yourself against other equal cars where the rich guy with the deep pockets doesnt have any advantages with his budget to "make him fast".

Glenn, use the license to open up the door to other opportunities and go racing with it in a spec class.
 

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to address Eddies post above, and the comparison to other offerings.

SCCA racing, and all W2W racing that i have done is not so much about "how much track time", but about the racing.

I have learned(and am still learning) to save my car and not go run every lap of every session prior to the race. i want to save my tires, my car, and myself for the "main event" the W2W racing session.

there is a guy here who schools me every time out in my 944. he runs 4-5 laps in qualifying, thats it, he gets in his fast laps, and saves his car/tires for the main event. he will do the 1st practice session for only a few laps also just to go out and verfiy that his cars works, and is set up how he wants it, then come in, not doing much of the total session time.
when you look at it in these terms, 15 minutes is more than adequite to "test your car", 15 minutes is enough to put down a good lap before you tires overheat, and 30 minutes is a long time when you are focused on the racing.

I used to complain about "not enough track time", until i really understood the idea behind what the racing and the sessions prior are for.

SCCA is all about racing, and not so much "how much track time" did you get.

I prefer quality time(competitive racing), over quantity(doing laps on the track).
the competiton is much more exciting to me than the practice time on the track, and is what i go for.
It is hard to be disciplined and not do every lap of every session though.
100% correct!
Thanks for giving away my secrets!!! I get a lot of **** for only running a few laps at our LCS events!

Just enough to shake down the car and learn the track!

This is why I was making a big push to have races and TT on both days at two day events!
 

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the better lap times are because of lower weight, lower center of gravity, slicks, and its a purpose built race car, not to mention much more durable.

many people do not have the desire to start out with the good choice of track cars and go small motor. I was at an event last time where they did HPDE, and this guy had been crashed into in level 2. he was pissing and moaning about his car, and that he was going to buy a BMW M35 or something, and I suggested that he buy something cheap, and low HP to learn with. he said "no way, not enough power for me". he will flounder at the HPDE 2 level for a long time because he will never learn about conserving momentum and going fast(unless he hires a coach and listens to the coach)

High HP masks driver defficiancies. when guys are fast in cars with smaller motors, they are usually then able to be fast in all cars, not so when guys who go from high HP car, then move into low HP cars because they are not used to working on conserving their momentum on corner exits.

20 years ago when i started motorcycle roadracing I had to have a
GSXR750, I was OK on it, but it was not until I got a FRZ400 that i learned about momentum, and how mistakes could not be made up for by simply gassing it on the straights. those lessons i keep with me today in my car racing.
Spec miata, Spec racer ford, formula ford, are all good choices to learn how to be fast in any car. racing W2W in these will also teach you because you can gauge yourself against other equal cars where the rich guy with the deep pockets doesnt have any advantages with his budget to "make him fast".

Glenn, use the license to open up the door to other opportunities and go racing with it in a spec class.
Glen,
I will be racing some spec 944. It was super fun and my car weighed 2675 at impound and I think only pushes 130 hp.

I highly suggest you try one, they are VERY WELL balanced on the track and are a blast to drive.

unlike the SFR or other purpose built race car they seem to be a lot tougher and held up well as I passed guys with two wheels in the dirt. I think they are much easier to maintain too IMO.

No that I am licensed I will be doing a bunch of skippy and russel racing in the spec classes till I figure out exactly where I want to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
the better lap times are because of lower weight, lower center of gravity, slicks, and its a purpose built race car, not to mention much more durable.

High HP masks driver deficiencies. when guys are fast in cars with smaller motors, they are usually then able to be fast in all cars, not so when guys who go from high HP car, then move into low HP cars because they are not used to working on conserving their momentum on corner exits.

20 years ago when i started motorcycle roadracing I had to have a
GSXR750, I was OK on it, but it was not until I got a FRZ400 that i learned about momentum, and how mistakes could not be made up for by simply gassing it on the straights. those lessons i keep with me today in my car racing.
Spec miata, Spec racer ford, formula ford, are all good choices to learn how to be fast in any car. racing W2W in these will also teach you because you can gauge yourself against other equal cars where the rich guy with the deep pockets doesnt have any advantages with his budget to "make him fast".

Glenn, use the license to open up the door to other opportunities and go racing with it in a spec class.
Josh is exactly right on with these statements.

I thought I could hang o.k. in the FI class in the LCS, but I was humbled by how slow I am in the SRF. But each time I go out in the SRF, I learn a ton regarding momentum, braking earlier, maintenance throttle, etc....I'm fairly confident the techniques I learn in the SRF will make me a faster driver in the Lotus.

Glen you are already fast in a fairly low HP Elise, but if you join a spec. class, you will know exactly where you stand with other guys.
Additionally, the racer in SCCA are super friendly and helpful. Robb is right that maintenance is cheaper in the spec 944's, but the SRF class is the biggest spec class in the SCCA. So if you like competition, join me!
Used SRF's go from 15k to 20k...
 

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Plastique, repainting my SRF, and I'm liking some of these color schemes...good ideas, that I may steal! ha!
 
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