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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've checked valve clearance before with a simple feeler guage. But it appears I'm going to need to actually set the valve clearance. Service manual indicates the use of some special tools (SST 09248-77010). Also looks like I need a tool capable of measuring shim thickness. I believe I can pickup the shims from local Toyota dealer to whatever size I need.

Formula used in service manual is:

A Thickness of new shim
B Thickness of used shim
C Measured valve clearance

Intake: A = B + (C - 0.13mm) X 1.5
Exhaust: A = B + (C - 0.27mm) X 1.5

Hints welcome.

1. Is the SST needed? If yes, assume can get from Toyota?
2. Any sources for a tool to measure shim thickness?
3. Is the clearance any different for aftermarket nitrate valves?

Thanks, Rob.
 

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I've checked valve clearance before with a simple feeler guage. But it appears I'm going to need to actually set the valve clearance. Service manual indicates the use of some special tools (SST 09248-77010). Also looks like I need a tool capable of measuring shim thickness. I believe I can pickup the shims from local Toyota dealer to whatever size I need.

Formula used in service manual is:

A Thickness of new shim
B Thickness of used shim
C Measured valve clearance

Intake: A = B + (C - 0.13mm) X 1.5
Exhaust: A = B + (C - 0.27mm) X 1.5

Hints welcome.

1. Is the SST needed? If yes, assume can get from Toyota?
2. Any sources for a tool to measure shim thickness?
3. Is the clearance any different for aftermarket nitrate valves?

Thanks, Rob.
A basic micrometer will measure shim thickness. The shim is the valve stem cap.
The special tool is for pushing down on the rocker while you slide in the feeler gauge. ( I think)

I thought the head was going to be "turn key".

Setting the lash is a pain. You have to have a big selection of shims to get the correct setting.
 

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1. Is the SST needed? If yes, assume can get from Toyota?
2. Any sources for a tool to measure shim thickness?
3. Is the clearance any different for aftermarket nitrate valves?

Thanks, Rob.
I don't know about 1 and 3, but for 2, use a micrometer...
 

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Hi Rob,

Here's how I did mine -

I ordered two 00 shims from Toyota, which is the thinnest available. Order two shims because you don't want to go through hassle compressing the spring and lifting the rocker to install only one. Installed two shims and measured the clearance. Calculate the difference between the 00 shim and the desired clearance to determine shim you need to purchase. You'll do this four times on each side (exhaust & intake). If you're lucky, some of the old shims will satisfy the clearance range.

BTW, there are two methods of measuring clearance. I used the 'old' method of measuring between the shim and rocker contact point. You'll need to bend your feeler gauge into a hockey stick shape.

Once I ordered & installed the correct shims to bring the 16 valves in spec, I measured clearances again to ensure they are correct. My valves are adjusted on the loose side of the clearance range. A Toyota race team mechanic gave me that tip, *may* prevent valve/cam problems.

Edit: Yes, the SST is needed. It's a set of two tools - a lever tool to compress the valve spring and a shim installation doohickey. They are expensive and it took a week to get them through Toyota (special order).

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jim/Tim,

Cool on Micrometer -- that's easy enough to get.

No go for the special tool from Toyota, they will not sell it to public -- have to see if I can find some alternative.

John,

Thanks, excellent tips! Can this be done with the SST ?

Rob
 

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Be careful using a micrometer to measure the thickness. The inside of the shim is not 'square'. The method I used is the safest, IMHO, because you're measuring clearance with the shim installed and settled on the valve tip.
 

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One more thing - if you use the old method of measuring, you do not need to use the formula. It's simple math to determine the shim needed. The formula you have above is for measurement between the cam lobe and rocker arm roller bearing. The 1.5 is to compensate for the arc of the swing rocker arm.
 

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Hi Rob,

Here's how I did mine -

I ordered two 00 shims from Toyota, which is the thinnest available. Order two shims because you don't want to go through hassle compressing the spring and lifting the rocker to install only one. Installed two shims and measured the clearance. Calculate the difference between the 00 shim and the desired clearance to determine shim you need to purchase. You'll do this four times on each side (exhaust & intake). If you're lucky, some of the old shims will satisfy the clearance range.

BTW, there are two methods of measuring clearance. I used the 'old' method of measuring between the shim and rocker contact point. You'll need to bend your feeler gauge into a hockey stick shape.

Once I ordered & installed the correct shims to bring the 16 valves in spec, I measured clearances again to ensure they are correct. My valves are adjusted on the loose side of the clearance range. A Toyota race team mechanic gave me that tip, *may* prevent valve/cam problems.

Edit: Yes, the SST is needed. It's a set of two tools - a lever tool to compress the valve spring and a shim installation doohickey. They are expensive and it took a week to get them through Toyota (special order).

John

Good info !
 

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I haven't adjusted the lash on the Elise, but I have to do it on my Elan's Twink. It takes a couple of steps.

Measure the current gap for each valve and write it down in a table.
Remove the shims, and measure them, and write it down in the table.
Calculate the new shims that you will need, and write it down in a table.
Install the new shims, and remeasure the gaps.

Make sure that you record the size and position of shim, as it will make it easier the next time (you already know what's in there so you can order new ones as needed). You can often "mix and match" shims - a shim you remove from one valve may be just what you need for another valve. You seldom have to buy a whole set of new shims.

Save the old shims, you may use them the next time in a different location. I keep my old shims in a jar (old baby food jar) half filled with oil.

On the Twink, it might be a bit harder than the Elise, as you have to remove the cams to get to the shims...
 

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darn maserati biturbo is a PIA also. cam removal required, 3 valves.cylinder.
when you say expensive, mainelotus, what's that?
curious.
thanks, sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
John,

I think I like your old method. So the special tools is not needed?
 

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Tim, as John said, you can't really measure the shims easily with a mic like you can on many other engines and the shim position on the valve isn't an issue since they can spin. The shims are little caps that sit on top of the valve stems and they have numbers on the side of them that is crossed to a chart for sizing---

While I haven't gone through the entire setup on the head myself (I'm lazy and just buy them set up), but if I did I would use John's strategy. It takes a lot of time regardless of the strategy, and using the 00 shims like he does seems to be as good as any....

Good luck with it Rob:up:

Phil
 

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you should also do your head and swap shims around before ordering anything so you can use everything you have before wasting your money on ones that you wont need.

i wouldnt recommend the micrometer either, here is a link that might help you guys


2ZZ Valve Adjustment Tool - Forums Index
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dustin,

Thanks for the link, most excellent. Fortunately it doesn't look like I'll need to do the lash. See thread I started here.
 

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no problem'o, well atleast it will be here in the future for other's.

another thing to remember when doing these is check your spec's if it tells you hot and/or cold measurements, especialy if you are using an aftermarket cam.

I swapped out someone's lift bolts yesterday, they were wearing, just another thing for you guys to remember to check while your in there or if your doing a new head to just use the cryo'd ones.
 

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If you don't have a special tool it's actually very easy and quick to just remove the camshafts to get access to the shims.

Does the Lotus manual include the shim selection grid? If not I can scan that from the Toyota manual and post it. That makes it pretty straightforward to select the right shims.
 

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If you don't have a special tool it's actually very easy and quick to just remove the camshafts to get access to the shims.

Does the Lotus manual include the shim selection grid? If not I can scan that from the Toyota manual and post it. That makes it pretty straightforward to select the right shims.
Good idea. The Elise/Exige Service Manual references the Toyota Service Manual for 99% of the Engine details. I'd post the page you're talking about myself, but I'm away from my copy. (I was reading over that section a couple of nights ago once I saw this thread. Yes, I sometimes read Service Manuals in my spare time :D).
 

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So if I understand this thread right, the following might be a method to avoid micrometers and SST, and yet also reuse the old shims where possible...

1. Install cams, timing chain, set appropriate cyls to TDC as described in manual and measure with the old shims in place
2. Remove chain, remove cams apply 00 shims, reinstall cams, reinstall chain, set req TDC & Measure with 00 shims (repeat until all measured with 00)
3. Calculate the differences to obtain verified actual heights of old shims.
4. Based on 2 and the results of 3 assign any qualifying old shims
5. Order remaining required shims.

I might invest some of the micrometer/SST savings in extra 00 shims however, since that seems like a long process.... This method assumes that 2 feeler measurements have no more error than a feeler measurement and a micrometer reading, which I wonder about slightly since feeler gauges are not as finely divided as micrometer readings....
 
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