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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i recently purchased the shifter111 and shifter cables from inokinetic I will be tackling the cables first, is it as simple as zip tying the old end to the new end and just pulling the old cable all the way out bringing the new cable with it in its place ?
 

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No. If it's like my Elise I attached a messenger line to assist getting new cables thru the bulkhead but there are guides and zip tie with eye attachment that secure the cables thru the engine bay. You will want to route your cables so they flow and curve easily no bends or kinks.
 

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I literally just installed the innokinetic cables and shifter on my 11S. The cables pull down through the floor of the tub at the center of the car. Once out, I duct taped the old to the new to get the length of the new cable as close as possible to the old. In hindsight, I still needed a significant amount of trial and error to get the shifting smooth while also having reverse (so im not sure my duct tape matching was that effective). DM me if you have questions. It was a daunting install, but ultimately more tinkering with adjustments than anything.
 

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Also, you might have to dink with the cable tension over time as it settles in. For me, getting into second is still sometimes a bit tricky. Ive tightened the cable a few times (like a quarter turn) which improves it for a bit, but after awhile I might start missing shifts as the cross-link doesn't quite match up and I can't get into second. I think my particular tranny is more sensitive than most.
 

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Maniacal Motorist
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Unless they have modified the design, the crossgate cable results in the shift lever sitting out-of-plane as compared to OEM. Rather than straight up and down for the 3rd/4th plane, it is angled right sightly. I had to shorten the threaded portion and ditch the jamnut do position it was close to center as possible.

Unsure if the newer modified spring profile addressed this issue.
 

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I just installed the shiftr111 earlier this year, along with a sub and amp, and also the BOE CAI. I encountered some of the same issues as others who posted. It was not unexpected, as these aren't just drop-in OEM replacement parts. I expected to have to do more fabrication than I actually did have to do, which was a nice surprise. A few tips for you that aren't in the instructions: 1) you can entirely remove the little false transmission tunnel that the assembly is mounted on, which makes it MUCH easier to work with when you have to drill into it (also there are a lot of wires under there that you just don't want to hit with a drill bit), 2) it is much easier to get the cables into the cabin if you remove two of the undertrays instead of just the rearmost one, 3) leave installing the cables for last, as they will just get in your way as you install the shiftr111 mechanism, 4) the holes you have to drill in the false transmission tunnel for the rivnuts are 35/64" (measured with calipers before I drilled), which just happens to be one of the sizes on (of all things) the larger of the two harbor freight step bits in their two bit set. Don't waste time trying to find that size as a drill bit, just get the set from HF. I bought mine as a disposable set for a different project since I figured I might mangle the bit, and HF is great for tools you don't mind destroying. Turns out they survived and the step drill was perfect size. Finally, once you have everything ready to install, toss some blue loctite on the bolts attaching the mechanism to the false transmission tunnel before you install everything, just to ensure nothing wiggles lose over time.

Unless they have modified the design, the crossgate cable results in the shift lever sitting out-of-plane as compared to OEM. Rather than straight up and down for the 3rd/4th plane, it is angled right sightly. I had to shorten the threaded portion and ditch the jamnut do position it was close to center as possible.

Unsure if the newer modified spring profile addressed this issue.
Once out, I duct taped the old to the new to get the length of the new cable as close as possible to the old. In hindsight, I still needed a significant amount of trial and error to get the shifting smooth while also having reverse (so im not sure my duct tape matching was that effective).
I had these same experiences. I laid the cables side by side and tried to get the new cables to the same lengths as the OEM ones before I installed them in the car. They weren't really all that close and needed a lot of adjustment anyhow.

Regarding the off-center lever, after a lot of fiddling with the mechanism, I discovered that there is an adjustment that you can make to fix that. Took a few extra hours to figure it out, but there is a little knob on the bottom of the driver side of the mechanism that is actually a through-bolt with a nut on the passenger side which you can adjust to move the stick back to center. You have to loosen (not remove!) the nut on the passenger side, then you can turn the knob and adjust the vertical position of the lever inside the mechanism. I would have taken a picture of the knob thing, but just figured it was just my luck to get the one that was out of adjustment and it wasn't a common problem. I also had to shorten the threaded portion with a hacksaw, but was able to retain the jamnut for the heim joint. The big issue for me was that the cable was like 1/4" too long to actually attach to the lever when fully screwed in on both ends to get R through 6 to all engage while attached to the lever. I figured out the adjustment knob after I shortened the cable, but once I figured that out, I found that the cable length was good enough that I could retain the jamnut and still have some adjustment threads.

In hindsight, I'd install the cables transmission side first, then get them close to where they attach to the shift lever, then adjust the shift lever so it is centered on the false transmission tunnel, then make all the final adjustments to ensure proper gear engagement when attached to the shift lever. I bought some extra long bolts for the cable-to-lever attachments just so that I could slide the heim joint on and off easier while doing the adjustments. Also, while you're at the store, buy several retaining clips for the cable attachment to transmission. They just disappear when you drop them in the engine bay when trying to clip them back on.
 

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Its not just a drop in replacement, but its not super difficult. You can do it, just take your time and you'll be fine. If you have some experience doing your own mechanic work, its doable. It's not like an engine swap or anything, just slightly more complicated than replacing OEM stuff with other OEM stuff. The only real fabrication required is drilling two holes for the rivnuts required to secure the new shift mechanism to the vehicle. I only wrote a book there because its fresh in my mind and was trying to help you avoid the mistakes I made and to help with some problem solving you might run into. I did it entirely by myself working on it sporadically over the winter because I don't drive my car in the snow.

Another thing that you might not have considered is that there are only 4 jack points, which are flat and relatively small, so you have to get a little creative in lifting the car. Also, because they are flat, in my opinion using normal jackstands is inadvisable as they might be unstable due to only having two small contact patches on each jackstand. I bought some flat top jack stands from Amazon and some raceramps for the front. Because there are only 4 jack points, I had to get creative in lifting the car. Drove the fronts onto the raceramps to lift front end, then used floor jack to lift one side of the rear until I could get motorcycle jack under the rear tire, then raised the motorcycle jack until the suspension compressed and lifted the vehicle enough to remove the floor jack and put the jackstand under the car. Rinse and repeat for the other side. Worked out well, as the motorcycle jack supports the tire on two sides instead of just one point on the center of the tire.

I know it seems like a lot, but don't get overwhelmed or discouraged. One step at a time and you can get it done, just might take some time. I did mine over the winter so I could work on it on weekends off and on and was under no time pressure, as I'm not about to drive my Evora in the snow. I also did a whole bunch of other projects because it was up on stands and interior was gutted, so it took me much longer than just doing the shiftr111. If you've not done something like it before, just take your time and know its a learning process that will get you more in tune with how your car works. I get a lot of satisfaction from working on the car by learning how things work and interact with each other. DM me if you run into any problems, and I'll try to help out.

Finally, I can tell you that the shiftr111 is a very noticeable upgrade over the stock shifter. It feels much more sharp and direct, more mechanical, and is less mushy/sloppy. I get a lot of peace of mind knowing that I won't have the dreaded blue ball failure again. It happened to me while I was at a rest stop in the mountains in Montana out of cell service. Which all would have been fine, but the payphone at the rest stop also didn't work, so I had to bribe a random stranger to call me a flat bed tow truck when they got into the town which was like 40 miles away. If nothing else, just the peace of mind that you won't just get completely stuck somewhere because of that is worth the cost of entry for the shiftr111.
 

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Galactic Hitchhiker
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Inside the cable tunnel there will be two "P-clips" holding the crossgate cable steady. They're held in by hex head bolts on the outside of the tunnel. Getting them off isn't bad... getting the clips back around the new crossgate cable and back into proper place will likely leave you cursing. Small fingers are a bonus. (so's a good shot of bourbon... lol!)

Acutal roll pin punches will also come in handy for the block that holds the cables in place in the shift mechanism near the lever.

It's not super easy, but it's all do-able. and getting the cables done is a bit easier as a 2-person job if you can enlist a buddy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Its not just a drop in replacement, but its not super difficult. You can do it, just take your time and you'll be fine. If you have some experience doing your own mechanic work, its doable. It's not like an engine swap or anything, just slightly more complicated than replacing OEM stuff with other OEM stuff. The only real fabrication required is drilling two holes for the rivnuts required to secure the new shift mechanism to the vehicle. I only wrote a book there because its fresh in my mind and was trying to help you avoid the mistakes I made and to help with some problem solving you might run into. I did it entirely by myself working on it sporadically over the winter because I don't drive my car in the snow.

Another thing that you might not have considered is that there are only 4 jack points, which are flat and relatively small, so you have to get a little creative in lifting the car. Also, because they are flat, in my opinion using normal jackstands is inadvisable as they might be unstable due to only having two small contact patches on each jackstand. I bought some flat top jack stands from Amazon and some raceramps for the front. Because there are only 4 jack points, I had to get creative in lifting the car. Drove the fronts onto the raceramps to lift front end, then used floor jack to lift one side of the rear until I could get motorcycle jack under the rear tire, then raised the motorcycle jack until the suspension compressed and lifted the vehicle enough to remove the floor jack and put the jackstand under the car. Rinse and repeat for the other side. Worked out well, as the motorcycle jack supports the tire on two sides instead of just one point on the center of the tire.

I know it seems like a lot, but don't get overwhelmed or discouraged. One step at a time and you can get it done, just might take some time. I did mine over the winter so I could work on it on weekends off and on and was under no time pressure, as I'm not about to drive my Evora in the snow. I also did a whole bunch of other projects because it was up on stands and interior was gutted, so it took me much longer than just doing the shiftr111. If you've not done something like it before, just take your time and know its a learning process that will get you more in tune with how your car works. I get a lot of satisfaction from working on the car by learning how things work and interact with each other. DM me if you run into any problems, and I'll try to help out.

Finally, I can tell you that the shiftr111 is a very noticeable upgrade over the stock shifter. It feels much more sharp and direct, more mechanical, and is less mushy/sloppy. I get a lot of peace of mind knowing that I won't have the dreaded blue ball failure again. It happened to me while I was at a rest stop in the mountains in Montana out of cell service. Which all would have been fine, but the payphone at the rest stop also didn't work, so I had to bribe a random stranger to call me a flat bed tow truck when they got into the town which was like 40 miles away. If nothing else, just the peace of mind that you won't just get completely stuck somewhere because of that is worth the cost of entry for the shiftr111.
Thanks think I'll save this project for when the weather gets bad and I don't plan on driving for a while lol ,I also I have been looking for some kind of scissor lift to make my life easier I hate jacking up the car especially since it's already so low smh
 
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