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I'll get a quote for my mechanic to check out the intake cam for peace of mind, fortunately enough there's no oil leakage from what i saw when i checked the car this morning for any burnt wires (none). Thanks for the information once again
I know you said you aren't very mechanically inclined, but it is super easy to get the valve cover off - lefty loosey is the only knowledge you really need. And, well, what a valve cover is, haha. If you do want to tackle it, there's plenty of info on here, and plenty of us will answer questions as you go, too. For what it is worth, I never really worked on a car until I got my Elise. Now I have a lift in my garage and won't pay a mechanic for anything other than mounting and balancing tires. I've priced the equipment, but can't quite justify it yet, haha.

Cam wiping also produces a ticking sound at idle, but so do injectors, so it can be hard to tell the difference since both are super close to each other.
 

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For racing yes for strictly street not really needed. Just google Lotus Elise catch cans and you'll see a number of vendors carrying manufacturers like BOE, Radium to name a couple.
Yes, I installed the Radium catch cans years ago and really like its setup. First the install: If a smuck like me can install it most folks should have no problems at all. Its neatly setup in my normally aspirated Elise's engine bay, looks cool, utilizes existing bolt holes, easy to check if its full...did I say it looks cool. :p

I highly recommend to let the 2ZZGE warm up for at least 10 minutes before you start letting it see high revs. Good to hear your car seems to be running fine nevertheless.
I just got bac
 

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2008 Lotus Elise California Edition
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Discussion Starter #23
I know you said you aren't very mechanically inclined, but it is super easy to get the valve cover off - lefty loosey is the only knowledge you really need. And, well, what a valve cover is, haha. If you do want to tackle it, there's plenty of info on here, and plenty of us will answer questions as you go, too. For what it is worth, I never really worked on a car until I got my Elise. Now I have a lift in my garage and won't pay a mechanic for anything other than mounting and balancing tires. I've priced the equipment, but can't quite justify it yet, haha.

Cam wiping also produces a ticking sound at idle, but so do injectors, so it can be hard to tell the difference since both are super close to each other.
I just got back from a drive today it still seemed fine no ticking at idle from i heard. So it could've been what another user said pretty much I didn't let the car warm up for atleast 10mins before redlining etc. But installing the exhaust was definitely a fun experience! I actually now enjoy working on cars, a bit frustrating at times but its fun over all. I can't wait to change the breaks on my elise to be honest haha.
 

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It may be that some of the oil vapors from the PCV were pushed out through the intake/air filter right behind the drivers door while you were driving it hard, up in the RPM ranges of the second cam. I noticed mine has done that when I've driven it hard. Then the odor goes away. Glad you're having fun with it.
Is your car supercharged? I've seen this happen on an SC car but never heard of it on an NA.
 

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Since I'm new to the Lotus community, I was curious. Catch cans seem to be a matter of debate on their need/usefulness on many enthusiast sites, so I was seeing what the general consensus is here.

My experience with catch cans doesn't come from a racing perspective, but more so from an as needed basis for a street car.

I have a '74 X1/9 with an aftermarket air filter and crankcase breather vent added by the PO. It used to fume like crazy at idle and would belch out oil vapor onto the engine compartment after some spirited driving. After teeing a line to the hose between the motor and breather, and plumbing it into the pcv port on the carburetor, my fumes were greatly diminished and oil was kept from entering the intake manifold tract.

My second car, a 2017 Fiat 124 Spider, does not have a catch can yet, but on the subsequent Fiat forums, a lot of people are noticing oil in the intake tract after dialing up the boost thru aftermarket tunes. In those instances, the catch can is keeping the intake tract clean. I do not have those kind of issues with my Spider so I do not run a catch can in that instance.

Anyways, there's my .02 regarding oil fumes/smoke.
If you don't have proper crankcase and head ventilation, you'll burn oil and loose compression. A properly functioning PCV system directs some oil vapor into the intake of the car to burn off, but not anywhere close to the amount that you'll burn without pressure relief. At the least, you should have proper ventilation.

Catch cans just contain the vapor, which condenses, and holds it for you to drain later instead of burning it off.

I don't think there's any debate that NOT burning oil is better than burning oil. The debate is, in street driving, is it worth the trouble to install a catch can.
 

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For racing yes for strictly street not really needed. Just google Lotus Elise catch cans and you'll see a number of vendors carrying manufacturers like BOE, Radium to name a couple.
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Doesn’t matter if you’re on track or on the back roads. It’s either entering the intake or it’s not - doesn’t matter where the engine load or RPM is occurring.
 

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If you don't have proper crankcase and head ventilation, you'll burn oil and loose compression. A properly functioning PCV system directs some oil vapor into the intake of the car to burn off, but not anywhere close to the amount that you'll burn without pressure relief. At the least, you should have proper ventilation.

Catch cans just contain the vapor, which condenses, and holds it for you to drain later instead of burning it off.

I don't think there's any debate that NOT burning oil is better than burning oil. The debate is, in street driving, is it worth the trouble to install a catch can.
I'm going to check my crankcase vent system then. Thanks.
 

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I would recommend an air/oil separator on most moden 4 cylinder engines that are rev'd. The engine failures I have seen seem to be from excess oil in the intake from excessive crankcase vapor scavenging. My guess is that manufacturers see the "free" hp/fuel economy from pulling a partial vacuum under the pistons. For the typical grocery getter, it's not a big deal, but if you spend a fair amount of time above 4,000 rpm, the stream of oil coming in from the crankcase can result in liquid oil in the intake. I replaced a Subaru with coked exhaust valves and a Mazda with rod bearing damage from low oil with no leaks present. Both had lots of oil in the intake. Venting to the atmo is illegal, so what you're looking for is a seperator.
 

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I just took my intercooler and throttle body off last week. I have catch cans and they maybe had a 1/4" of oil in only one of the catch cans. I ran gasoline through the intercooler and it was barely green, there was very little deposits on my throttle body butterfly or even the manifold to the supercharger. I would guess over 17k since the last time I took it all off.

So my subjective opinion is that catch cans do their job, but if you have excessive oil in catch cans then you might have another issue developing. Since all oily deposits were in catch can and not the rest of my intake I have to call that success.

I am sorry I have no further help for your scenario, but hope you update the thread.
 

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I actually think this might be a lot more simple then everyone is thinking. If you just had the muffler end of the exhaust done it's probably just residue from dirty hands, oil from hands, packing material, etc on the muffler. It only gets hot enough to burn that material off when driven hard. Any leak after the cat should not have much or any color to it, and an exhaust leak before doesn't have much color especially if it isn't tuned (set to rich). You should never really see dark or black smoke from the exhaust except for a tuned rich, cat less setup. Oil or residue burning off has a totally different smell and look than exhaust. Maybe I should read the op again, but I think it sounded like residue burning off. Of course the drivers side only does sound like it's coming from the intake, so pcv is plausible. Aside from making sure there's no oil leaks it doesn't sound too serious to me. If it's just a little coming from the air box, I'd say blow by/pcv system, and okay after a really hard charge.
 

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I actually think this might be a lot more simple then everyone is thinking. If you just had the muffler end of the exhaust done it's probably just residue from dirty hands, oil from hands, packing material, etc on the muffler. It only gets hot enough to burn that material off when driven hard. Any leak after the cat should not have much or any color to it, and an exhaust leak before doesn't have much color especially if it isn't tuned (set to rich). You should never really see dark or black smoke from the exhaust except for a tuned rich, cat less setup. Oil or residue burning off has a totally different smell and look than exhaust. Maybe I should read the op again, but I think it sounded like residue burning off. Of course the drivers side only does sound like it's coming from the intake, so pcv is plausible. Aside from making sure there's no oil leaks it doesn't sound too serious to me. If it's just a little coming from the air box, I'd say blow by/pcv system, and okay after a really hard charge.
That would be the first guess but it's not a new exhaust. The OP bought it used.
 

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That would be the first guess but it's not a new exhaust. The OP bought it used.
Used might make that more likely, but I imagine you mean more like an anti rust coating. Used someone pulled the pans getting road grime on their hands, manhandled it out, then probably stored it in the garage for a while picking up stuff, then he bought it (didnt it get shipped then?). On reinstallation it again picks up road grime and hand oils, etc. No matter new or used, most newly installed items have a "burn in period".
 

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Used might make that more likely, but I imagine you mean more like an anti rust coating. Used someone pulled the pans getting road grime on their hands, manhandled it out, then probably stored it in the garage for a while picking up stuff, then he bought it (didnt it get shipped then?). On reinstallation it again picks up road grime and hand oils, etc. No matter new or used, most newly installed items have a "burn in period".
just installed, not newly. lol
 

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I know you said you aren't very mechanically inclined, but it is super easy to get the valve cover off - lefty loosey is the only knowledge you really need. And, well, what a valve cover is, haha. If you do want to tackle it, there's plenty of info on here, and plenty of us will answer questions as you go, too. For what it is worth, I never really worked on a car until I got my Elise. Now I have a lift in my garage and won't pay a mechanic for anything other than mounting and balancing tires. I've priced the equipment, but can't quite justify it yet, haha.

Cam wiping also produces a ticking sound at idle, but so do injectors, so it can be hard to tell the difference since both are super close to each other.
I keep putting this off, and know "what and how" to do it, but am not sure if a new valve cover gasket is required. Some cars no issue to reuse, others are highly recommended to replace. I am not sure in this case and I currently have not ordered a spare yet.
Recommendations?
 

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I keep putting this off, and know "what and how" to do it, but am not sure if a new valve cover gasket is required. Some cars no issue to reuse, others are highly recommended to replace. I am not sure in this case and I currently have not ordered a spare yet.
Recommendations?
My approach is nominally to re-use rubber and metal gaskets if they look to be intact AND I am putting the original parts back. But honestly, I tend to resuse gaskets more than I probably should.
 
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