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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering how much better the handling is on the Elise with the sport package?? Will it eliminate the slight under steer of the standard Elise?? How much is ride quality compromised? I assume the car will turn in a little better??
 

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There have been a few threads on this and from my recollection, this is the summary I came away with:
- the driver can induce understeer and oversteer in both cars, but the sport pack makes it easier to induce oversteer and the driver should be prepared to catch a more sudden breakaway at the limit
- the sport pack may have a bit less understeer, but most of the base package understeer comes from improper driving. Remember Clarkson cranking the wheel in the Top Gear video?
- most drivers cannot take advantage of the extended performance envelope, however that does not mean you will not be faster with the sport pack on certain roads, as the tires do account for some extra grip. Some drivers may feel more confident with the standard setup.
- the sport package is good for lower lap times when driven at the limit, depending on the track. Maybe 1-2 seconds on a 1 minute lap. See Autocar article.
- the sport package gives up some compliance and a lot of British mags prefer the non-sport on less than smooth surfaces

The sport package is for you if you compete in SCCA sanctioned events (edit: not sure if the rules allow you to change springs, but shocks are a go), or want the best package currently available from the factory. Drivers should take into account their maturity level and/or skill level with honesty IMO. If you lack driving skill, then you should have maturity not to overstep your bounds on public roads (true of standard suspension owners too). Not trying to disuade sport package purchasers, but I just don't want to see every buyer get the sport package automatically because they think it's "better".

You might skip the sport package if you don't need the exta performance, need extra bump compliance, or plan to upgrade to an aftermarket suspension that could outperform the sports package.

This should give you a good base to start with until more educated opinions arrive. I think neither package is necessarily better, as they suit slightly different needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Vantage, thanks for your input..

I am probably going to pass on the sport package, I don't have any experience on the track and I also read that with the standard suspension it kind of lets the driver know when they are at the limit of traction where the sport just lets go at a higher limit without notice. I think I need that window of comfort.
Maybe once I an used to the car and track driving I can always change it around later.
cheers
 

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its a 2200 dollar option or thereabouts....
if u want lighter rims and stickier tires, never mind the adjustable ride hgt, how much do u think that will cost u??
also, the lighter rims give u better acceleration, not just handling...
 

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Re: stickier tires, that also means substantially faster wear rates (this is the trade-off). As a reference point, the chrome orange press car that was featured in the R&T article a few months back has the LSS wheels and the stickier tires, and after about 1200 miles, the tires were about "done", according to the car's keepers. Granted, this car was probably "ridden hard and put away wet" numerous times, being thrashed by the automotive press and all, but still....changing tires can really add up fast, esp. if the car is going to be a daily driver.
 

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Vantage said:
The sport package is for you if you compete in SCCA sanctioned events (edit: not sure if the rules allow you to change springs, but shocks are a go), or want the best package currently available from the factory.
I don’t agree with your comment here. The sports package is not the best package. It is simply a different package. Today I drove the Liz in the rain. It was pouring down. Was I concerned? No! Why? Because I didn’t opt for the LSS package. The standard setup is excellent both in the wet and dry. I cruised along at 80 mph plus and she felt rock solid. Better than virtually everything else I have driven. Only a fool would try those speeds on the roads I traveled in a LSS equipped car in those weather condition. The LSS equipped cars are like most other sports cars in the rain. Next time it’s pouring down take note of the Corvettes you see. Nine out of ten times they are crawling along. That extra tire width and lower tread severely impedes wet weather performance. Also LSS tires will not perform as well as the standard tires if they are not up to temperature.
I won’t get into the many disadvantages to the stiffer ride and lower ride height.
Like I’ve always maintained, the LSS setup is different, NOT better.
 

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evomind said:
its a 2200 dollar option or thereabouts....
if u want lighter rims and stickier tires, never mind the adjustable ride hgt, how much do u think that will cost u??
also, the lighter rims give u better acceleration, not just handling...
I can buy lighter rims and stickier tires if I had a non-LSS car and I would end up with two sets of rims and tires for about the same cost. When you buy the LSS option, you get only one set of rims and tires.

For many people such.... you will need two sets of rims if you want to run race rubber.

Vantage summed it up pretty well. There are a lot of trade offs.

I think I have posted this 10 times now... but LSS makes sense for a certain group of drivers. Those less experienced, do not do a lot of motorsports, live with concrete roads.... should consider not getting it. Those very serious about motorsports and will probably go aftermarket with shocks, etc... can do better spending their money elsewhere.

I have LSS and I will be getting other rims, other tires, other shocks, other alignment, and probably a custom swaybar.
 

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As I posted to Roadfly

This is something I thought early in the year. The LSS makes sense for certain people.

Let's first consider the group that should not get it.

1. Does not do motorsports. Not a lot of interest or a little fear, so will not do any motorsports.
2. Does not understand and is not trained to handle sudden oversteer. If you go into a corner too hot and your reaction is a sudden lift or use of the brakes, do not get LSS.
3. You live in an area with broken roads and/or think the Miata is a rough ride.
4. You are very serious in motorsports and/or campaign the car seriously.

There is a pretty large middle ground between the first 3 and the last number 4. These people should get LSS and enjoy it, if they have the money to burn. You may also want to get LSS because you think it's better and you want to have the best car that Lotus makes for this market. And/or the $2500 is not a big deal to you. I don't agree that it is better, because I think 95% of the people out there will not use the additional envelope afforded by the LSS, other than that because of the stickier tires.

For most people, they could run sticker tires (in spite of the protests from Lotus) and would get as much benefit, IMO.


Back to those in the fourth group. And I am one of those. Did it make sense? I am not so sure. On one hand, it's nice to have some things sorted out of the box. I don't have to mess with the steering rack and lowering the car. I have some nice street rims from Rimstock. I have some very nice street tires in the A048s.

But if I did not do it, I would have $2500 (plus tax!) to spend on another set of rims, which I will end up having to get anyways. I will use the Hoosier sticky tires. And I will probably take out and replace the shocks with some custom ones we will be developing that will allow adjustment of rebound and compression. Plus some other stuff.

I don't feel bad about getting LSS myself... but if I was specifying an order tomorrow, it would not have it on the car. I would also forget Touring Package too, other than the cargo net and Los Angeles Blaupunkt stereo (which I could easily have upgraded). I don't care about the electric windows, carpet, and insulation. Funny, I want a cupholder, but the rest of the stuff I don't care about. I originally specified Touring because of the way the LA Auto Show standard cloth seats looked like. The final cloth seats look great.

Randy
 

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Hi Derek,
I agree, see my last sentence of the original post. Should have said, "most track oriented", instead.
 
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