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Not likely. Lotus does not use a standard triple-square or Torx; ours is a proprietary 10-point pattern made by an Italian firm.

Go to your dealer, it's a cheap part. Ordering one from the UK will easily cost you more in shipping than the actual adaptor, even if it is the right one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The closest dealer is a good 3 hour drive away. I'll be calling Monday morning to get another one. I do think their body shop has mine though as it was in my trunk before it was sent down for work.
 

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yeah sounds like you should ask them to give it back or supply you with one. Still, I would recommend getting another one for backup, as these things aren't easily available when you need them most.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If they are inexpensive I will be picking up 2 as I want one in the vehicle and one at my home.
 

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Plackslayer, I think I have an extra. I can next day it to you so you can get your work done? Dont worry about the cost. If it will help you out let me know.
 

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And for circumstances like this, the reasoning for going to studs becomes clear.
 

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And for circumstances like this, the reasoning for going to studs becomes clear.
I would totally do it if the Radium product were not so expensive. I just bought another set of the star variety from Yoram so I can powder coat them in black just in case I don't like it.

USGPRU27 - you have a PM.

--J
 

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And for circumstances like this, the reasoning for going to studs becomes clear.
Well, no.

Switching to a bolt with a conventional head, maybe. But I'm still to be convinced that a stud is better than a bolt.

What's odd is that it's you racer guys who make the stud argument. For someone in competition, a wheel fastener is a consumable. They stretch after repeated torquings, and should be replaced for safety. It seems to be that a bolt makes vastly more sense for that application than a stud does. Which may be why you see bolts on cars like, say, a Lotus.

I've switched my fasteners to BMW bolts, and will post on that shortly. I did this more for convenience than anything else, because that 10-point key might get lost one day or get damaged from repeated use. But studs still seem kind of pointless to me-- unless you're saying you are putting new studs in the hub in your workshop every season, in which case I withdraw my comments above.
 

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Convenience is one of the reasons for studs. You pick up the tire, slide it over studs and can then pull your hands free. No fumbling (holding the tire with one hand) while rotating the tire to find the hole for a bolt and then trying to thread it in. Studs are usually made from a higher (and harder) grade steel than bolts. If you cross thread a nut on a stud, replace the stud. If you cross thread a screw into your hub, you are out replacing a hub. No fancy 10 point bolt gizmo to lose, strip, or wear. If you do need extra security, then you can always use security nuts (although I won't) Reasons go on and on. Still, you are largely correct, it does tend to be a racer thing. Bolts are fine if the only time the wheels are off, is to replace the tires every couple years. Bolts tend to be a European thing (not specifically a racer thing), studs tend to be an American thing.
 

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I don't think you actually read my message, so if you don't mind I'll go point by point:

Convenience is one of the reasons for studs. You pick up the tire, slide it over studs and can then pull your hands free. No fumbling (holding the tire with one hand) while rotating the tire to find the hole for a bolt and then trying to thread it in.
Since the wheels on our cars locate on a central boss, there is no "fumbling" involved. But I'll go ahead and concede this point.

Studs are usually made from a higher (and harder) grade steel than bolts.
Sorry, that is incorrect. It doesn't even make sense on the face of it.

If you cross thread a nut on a stud, replace the stud. If you cross thread a screw into your hub, you are out replacing a hub.
If you crossthread either a lug nut or lug bolt, you are an idiot. However, let's put that aside.

If you crossthread a nut, in order to remove the stud you have to remove the hub. If you crossthread a bolt, the thread can be repaired with a Time-Sert in situ, however most people will still end up removing the hub for convenience (i.e. to take it to the machine shop, since most folks won't want to pay for the Time-Sert kit or don't trust themselves to do the work). So, call this one a draw.

No fancy 10 point bolt gizmo to lose, strip, or wear.
You can switch to conventional hex-head bolts if you don't like the 10pt gizmo. I have, as I mentioned.

Still, you are largely correct, it does tend to be a racer thing. Bolts are fine if the only time the wheels are off, is to replace the tires every couple years.
This is flat wrong. Studs, like bolts, stretch each time they are torqued. Studs are fine if you're replacing the tires every couple of years, but if you are constantly retorquing nuts on them (as you racers do) they will stretch to the replacement point much more quickly. You have it precisely backwards.

Lug bolts are a wear item and should be replaced periodically, especially if the car is used in competition. This is true of studs as well, it's just that it's a hell of a lot easier to replace bolts.

I'm not really trying to convince you, because it's hopeless. People go along with what "everyone else" is doing, even if it makes no damn sense. (If that offended you, then please prove to me that studs don't stretch.) I just want to get the information out there so that the next Lotus I buy hasn't had studs Loctited into the hubs by some guy who read on the internet that racers liked them.

Threaded rods stretch. So why would you want them permanently affixed to your hubs, rather than easily disposable? Simple: you don't.
 

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I believe we will simply have to agree, to disagree. When you get some time, put some quality studs on a rockwell tester, compare that to stock bolts, get back with me; although, the result of that test is already known to me.
 

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Well, no.

Switching to a bolt with a conventional head, maybe. But I'm still to be convinced that a stud is better than a bolt.

What's odd is that it's you racer guys who make the stud argument. For someone in competition, a wheel fastener is a consumable. They stretch after repeated torquings, and should be replaced for safety. It seems to be that a bolt makes vastly more sense for that application than a stud does. Which may be why you see bolts on cars like, say, a Lotus.

I've switched my fasteners to BMW bolts, and will post on that shortly. I did this more for convenience than anything else, because that 10-point key might get lost one day or get damaged from repeated use. But studs still seem kind of pointless to me-- unless you're saying you are putting new studs in the hub in your workshop every season, in which case I withdraw my comments above.
I have another reason for keeping my bolts. I street park my car in New York every night, and I see cars in the neighborhood all the time up on blocks. It's cheap insurance against wheel theft, the way our stock wheels are designed you can't even use the 19mm 12-point socket + sledgehammer trick that works on BMWs.
 

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I believe we will simply have to agree, to disagree. When you get some time, put some quality studs on a rockwell tester, compare that to stock bolts, get back with me; although, the result of that test is already known to me.
If you're talking about an aftermarket, upgraded stud, you need to compare it to an aftermarket, upgraded bolt.

"Studs are usually made from a higher (and harder) grade of steel," is what you said which, again, is nonsense.

Studs stretch, just like bolts do. (That's why you didn't reuse the head studs when you built your hi-po racing motor... or the rod bolts.) But I'll bet you a new Rockwell tester that I can swap out all the lug bolts on a car faster than you can swap out the studs. I can even do it without removing the wheels! :D
 

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I have another reason for keeping my bolts. I street park my car in New York every night, and I see cars in the neighborhood all the time up on blocks. It's cheap insurance against wheel theft, the way our stock wheels are designed you can't even use the 19mm 12-point socket + sledgehammer trick that works on BMWs.
Makes sense to me. Plackslayer is finding out just how hard those things are to remove! ;) (Just razzing you, Placky!)
 

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Regardless, my car is primarily a street car, I plan to replace the bolts every 5 years or so (with OEM), and I doubt I'm going to be having problems with the bolts turning themselves out or breaking. I'll take the convenience so I can waste more time cleaning up the wear and tear on other parts so the car keeps looking new.
 

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Regardless, my car is primarily a street car, I plan to replace the bolts every 5 years or so (with OEM), and I doubt I'm going to be having problems with the bolts turning themselves out or breaking. I'll take the convenience so I can waste more time cleaning up the wear and tear on other parts so the car keeps looking new.
Right on. And thanks for flying the Lotus flag in NYC-- the first time I ever saw a Lotus on the street was when I moved to New York as a teenager. It was sooooo cool. And I thought, man, if I ever get a Lotus, it's going to be British racing green just like that one...

You're probably creating the next generation of Lotus owners without even realizing it!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The first time I ever saw a Lotus was in San Francisco on the Golden Gate Bridge. It was what I believe to be a '62 23B and I fell in love immediately.

My 911 crush came in high school and because I could get one of those that fit my requirements I got one of those first but am very happy now that I have done both of my dream cars from my childhood.
 

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I have accumulated several of those adapters from LotusGarage on-line and from my local dealer. They are not too expensive.

I had over-torqued the bolts and consequently broken a few adapters. I now have a proper torque wrench LOL.
 
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