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Discussion Starter #1
I understand that the sport package cars get a slightly relocated steering rack. I heard that a different plate is used. Is this retrofittable? The PIC below seems to show the front frame...the steering rack appears to live in the frame...see the tie rod end? Anyone know more?



Stan
 

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I'm not much of a technical expert, but supposidely the sports pack is retrofitable very easily. Chris mentioned that a few cars were augmented with the sport pack in a matter of hours for the Barber introduction.

Edit:
Ahah, I found it:

zvezdah1 said:
Fortunately converting back to standard suspensio wouldnt be a huge deal, they could certainly sell off the LSS parts. I watched them convert one of the LA show cars to LSS suspension at LCU just before the Barber launch, only took a few hours.
Chris
 

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The mounting plates move the steering rack upwards a little as the car is lowered to keep the correct angles between the steering rack arms and the hub carriers for the right bump-steer responses.

Replacing these plates is not terribly difficult (you will need to drill out a rivet and use a rivet-gun to install a new one), but as the photo shows it's a bit fiddly and takes some time to do as you have little space to work in.

The steering rack is indeed inside a hollow chassis beam that runs from side-to-side through the front of the car. Getting it out completely usually involves a lot of cursing and shouting :)

Bye, Arno.
 

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Stan said:
I understand that the sport package cars get a slightly relocated steering rack. I heard that a different plate is used. Is this retrofittable? The PIC below seems to show the front frame...the steering rack appears to live in the frame...see the tie rod end? Anyone know more?



Stan
Do you intend to order the car without the sport pack and then retrofting the sport pack? If so you'll probably save more time and money by ordering from the factory. At $2,480 that's a great deal. Consider this. Ordering the sport pack wheels, dampers, coils, etc seperately will probably cost at least $2,480 and then you'd have to install it. If you are gonna have your dealer install it then you pay more $ and the tech will probably be doing this for the first time on an Elise. Get it done from the factory. In the end it's less expensive and more likely will be done correctly the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Pic I Found...



And a view from the footwell of a bare frame (no rack) FYI...I think the black riveted thingey is another variation of the bits in that area. Basically the spacer plate positions the rack at the correct height to achieve the desired bump steer characteristics, and then the rack retaining bolts hold the rack at that height through slotted holes whose travel includes both stock and sport rack heights.

Does anyone know if the beefier Euro sport rear toe link / brackets are part of the US Sport package?



Stan
 

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Hmm, that does look a bit tricky. I've never tried pop-riveting before...

Huggy Bear, I think you're right about the cost if one were to buy all Lotus components. But I think it would be cheaper if you bought the SSR wheels, the other parts from Lotus, and did most of the installation yourself. Especially if you could send the shocks to Bilstein to be rebuilt to LSS specs instead of ordering a new set from Lotus. That depends on Bilstein's right hand knowing what the left hand is doing (the office doing the rebuilding would have to have access to information about the LSS valving).
 

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John Stimson said:
Hmm, that does look a bit tricky. I've never tried pop-riveting before...
It's extremely simple, you just need the right tool (<$20). From the looks of things, I'm guessing the pop rivet is used to align the height setting plate vertically, and not doing much else (except for helping to hold things in place during assembly).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
>>>From the looks of things, I'm guessing the pop rivet is used to align the height setting plate vertically, and not doing much else (except for helping to hold things in place during assembly).<<<

Exactly, that's all it appears to do. It's NOT a structural rivet and is not holding the frame or steering rack together. All it does is allow the rack to be fixed at the correct height which is achieved when the plate and bracket holes for the rivet line up with one another. When that occurs the rack bolts can only go through the bracket at one height. Since the vertically slotted holes in the frame bracket are covered by the plate which has only round holes through which the fasteners can pass. In the photo above the black bracket has the two rack bolt holes with the vertically elogated slots in plain view. When the rack height adjusting plate is placed over this piece, only two round bolt holes would be visible.

Stan
 

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John Stimson said:
But I think it would be cheaper if you bought the SSR wheels, the other parts from Lotus, and did most of the installation yourself.
Keep in mind that a set of SSRs+A048s is $2k. That does not leave much for a Bilstein rebuild/revalve, additional required parts, install and alignment.

$2.5k for the Sport pack is a great value. You can't match this unless you sold your stock wheels/tires to offset.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's some other cool stuff. The rear suspension bump steer curves to be achieved via spacers repositioning the rod ends of the rear toe links. This is why I asked if the rear suspension of the LSS cars gets the different toe link or not. Ball joint versus shimmed rod end and braces. Likely not as they do talk about a much lower rid height in the text.





Stan
 

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shinoo said:
Keep in mind that a set of SSRs+A048s is $2k. That does not leave much for a Bilstein rebuild/revalve, additional required parts, install and alignment.

$2.5k for the Sport pack is a great value. You can't match this unless you sold your stock wheels/tires to offset.
You're still assuming that I want all the parts of the LSS pack.

I will say again: if the LSS is exactly what you want, it makes much more sense to just order it with the car rather than buying the parts individually.

However, the LSS isn't exactly what I want, so the cost analysis isn't going to work out the way you expect. Here's my assessment:

Springs: $400 (most springs are $50, this allows for 100% Lotus markup)
Steering rack spacers: $200 (they don't look like they could cost this much)
Bilstein revalve: $220 (exact cost)
SSRs: $1400
$2220, which leaves me with a set of stock wheels and tires to sell off. I wind up with the SSRs, which I prefer over the LSS wheels (supposed to be lighter, right?). I also have a set of standard wheels and tires to sell off.

LSS package: $2480, with a set of A048s to sell off.

Not such a big difference...if the LSS factory wheels aren't much heavier than the SSRs, I might just go with the LSS package for simplicity's sake.
 

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For the S2 at the moment there is no uniball (rod end) style toe link kit. It uses the normal ball-joints.

Seems the S2 hub carrier design is a little better than the S1. So farI haven't heard/read about people bending or breaking toe link bolts that attach to the hub carrier.

But nonetheless.. If people will be running full slicks then regular checks of these are important to 'catch' any problems as they develop.

Bye, Arno
 

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Discussion Starter #14
>>>Steering rack spacers: $200 (they don't look like they could cost this much)<<<

The rack spacer is a small, flat, rectangular piece of steel with three holes in it. The car would cost about 10,000,000 if the rest of it was priced in this manner!

Stan
 

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Discussion Starter #15
>>>So farI haven't heard/read about people bending or breaking toe link bolts that attach to the hub carrier. But nonetheless.. If people will be running full slicks then regular checks of these are important to 'catch' any problems as they develop. <<<

Besides using double shear brackets to strengthen and stabilize things, the different links allow the rear suspension bump steer to be tuned to match the ride height and expected high grip from slicks.

Stan
 

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Discussion Starter #16
>>>Great info! Where did you find it?<<<

It's from Lotus...part of their Motor Sports service detail. Lots of info out there as the earlier cars are fundamentally quite similar.

Stan
 
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