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2006 Lotus Elise, Ardent Red/Magnolia, Touring, Sport, Hard top, Traction Control, Limited Slip, 1 o
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There are a couple threads concerning front calipers to rear that may help you. Do a quick search for that subject.
 

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2006 Lotus Elise, Ardent Red/Magnolia, Touring, Sport, Hard top, Traction Control, Limited Slip, 1 o
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290 Posts
Unfortunately, I cannot help you with the math but, the only way to address the base brake bias issue is to either; a)increase the the caliper size at the rear or b)remove the entire ABS system and plumb the rears with your own proportioning valve(in which case you may still need to increase the the rear caliper size). The current ABS system contains no magic, in fact, it is a very simple ABS system and is not suited for competition use. I use a front on rear setup but, I need to obtain the AP calipers that have the slightly smaller pistons (43.5 mm). I feel the stock fronts on the rear is just a wee bit too much rear. I'm not a fan of staggerring brake pads for comp applications as they just tend to warm up at different rates which is an issue in and of itself. There has to be someone on LT that can do the fluid math for the factory piston sizes front and rear (I always had to defer to a race engineer pal in the past for my racecar).
 

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2006 Lotus Elise, Ardent Red/Magnolia, Touring, Sport, Hard top, Traction Control, Limited Slip, 1 o
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290 Posts
The AP model number is CP5317 which has a 41.3mm bore. The additional upside is that you use the same pads on all four corners. There are very few AP dealers in the states but, Elise Parts in the UK carries them at about $850 for the pair. That price is about right as AP are plenty pricey. I just think it is the simplest solution with the easiest maintenance over the long run as well. I still have the current front AP's on the rear(for the past 18,000miles) but, this is my next upgrade. That piston differential should be about right. I understand everyone's braking technique is a bit different-as for me, I found that increasing those rears allows the car to go way deep without triggering the ABS(on clean, dry pavement and proper tires). Mind you, that shock setup will also have some influence on your results as well.
 
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