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Discussion Starter #1
I hate to start a new thread but I can't seem to find an existing thread that answers my question. I have looked through many threads on this forum about superchargers installed on an elise. I am at this time looking at an Elise for sale that has a sector 111 supercharger on it. Yes I know they generate lots of HP. I am a little concerned about the driveability of the car with a supercharger. By that I mean how does the power come on? Is it a big blast of power that comes on all at once, or are you still able to finesse the car with the throttle.
I rode in a Miyata that had a supercharger. The car had gobs of power but it all came on at once. In a stock Miyata you can use the throttle to "throttle steer" the car in a corner. It's a beautiful thing. Putting a supercharger on the Miyata ruined that. The end result is a much faster car that had lost a piece of it's soul. Perhaps that particular car had a poorly designed supercharger, I don't really know.
Do any of you that have superchargers feel you lost some of the throttle feel and control you had with a stock engine?
I love HP but there are also other considerations ....
Thanks
 

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Addict
2007 Lotus Exige S
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I haven’t driven a non-supercharged Elige, but love the supercharged Exige. Superchargers are belt driven and to me do not seem to add power suddenly. This is not a turbo that spools up based on exhaust flow and creates that feeling of power suddenly being added. It is also not nitrous where the power is added all of a sudden. Now the cam change can cause the feeling of a sudden power change, not sure how much the supercharger magnifies that compared to the NA version. I know there are people that prefer NA motors, but I’m not one of them. I don’t feel the car is losing any soul with boost, and I’m guessing you’ll be glad it has a few extra ponies. Throttle control is still good; maybe a few other aftermarket parts and then a new tune would make it better for you if needed.
 

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It's not as pure as a NA motor but really, the DBW elises kind of suck when it comes to the connectivity between your feet and the wheels. In a stock Elise, the is throttle delay and extremely floppy engine mounts the make lifting mid-corner a really annoying experience. It's because of this that I started left foot braking. I was on a mountain run in my stock Elise and it was pretty bad. My S2000 and even my STS CRX (national championship winning car) was very good at handling minor throttle inputs.

So, if you LFB, it's not going to be an issue at all. Just know that the supercharger will add a lot of drag which means when you lift, there's a lot more engine braking going on. Having a smooth, slow right foot will help tremendously.

And to your original question, no, I have a Rev400 and the is still fantastic.
 

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I don't know about other folks but, my 06 with a Katana2 is quite good. It was installed nearly 26000 miles ago-I drive it everyday. The throttle response is instant, the torque curve is linear and seamless. If you had never driven a NA Elise and only drove mine, you would assume that it was factory fresh. As for the DBW; other people may be having issues but, my throttle response is outstanding. I've driven many other make/model cars with DBW(most new cars have it now) and I have to say the Lotus is damn good-no lag and shuts the throttle immediately when you lift. Many cars have a "dashpot strategy" in the PCM that allows the the revs to drop slowly when you lift but, to their credit, Lotus got it right. As far as power application-if the tune is right, the power is smooth and completely controllable. I highly suggest it. Oh, yeah; just returned from a trip to Zion National park and got 34mpg to top it off!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I like the sound of "linear and seamless" Do 2005 Elises have DBW?
I thought that was introduced in the 06 model. On most cars DBW sucks. On my Abarth I installed a "gopedal". it is adjustable and that reduces that DBW lag to almost nil. I haven't investigated if a like product is produced for the Elise but I assume there is one out there.
 

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No, 2005 does not have DBW. You are correct, many cars tend to have less than perfect electronic throttle strategies. I will say though, that many of those models are improving as models update.
 

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Less is Better
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The simple answer is, you have to drive it. I know there are people on the board who bought their car without having seen it, let alone driven it. But especially for a car with significant aftermarket parts, you don't know how it's really set up or how well the work has been done.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The simple answer is, you have to drive it. I know there are people on the board who bought their car without having seen it, let alone driven it. But especially for a car with significant aftermarket parts, you don't know how it's really set up or how well the work has been done.
Yes, I totally agree. Cars with a lot of modifications can be really great or they can be poorly sorted out and a BIG headache to get right. Combine that with having to fly hundreds of miles to drive a car you're looking at. Kind of daunting.... It almost makes me want to keep the 91 elan. btw It's a vastly underrated little car. The shifter on it really suckes though.
The mods that scare me the most are suspension related. Some of those type mods are just kluged together. The boy racer syndrome, "if the car is lower and the springs are stiffer it must be faster and better".
Thankfully I don't see all that much of that type of thinking on most lotus forums.
 

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Mine drives better with the charger, the power is big but its very gradual and the 2nd came isnt as big of a hit like an NA. Its very control able. Vf stage
 

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I bought my car Normally Aspirated (NA). The 6250 rpm cam changeover sucked if it happened mid corner (autocross or track) due to the sudden shift in torque and HP. When a supercharger was added to the car, cam changeover was moved to 5000 rpms. This is the point where the small cam and the big cam make roughly equal HP. With the cam changeover point moved down, the car was actually easier to drive. The HP is now smooth and progressive. My car is a 2005; it is throttle by cable, instead of throttle by electronic wire.
 

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Mine is a 2005 Rev300 (TVS blower).

Before? LOVED the abrupt cam changeover (although, my changeover point was lowered to high 5000s RPMs, vs. Low 6000s while I was still NA) and I didn't need to be terribly judicious with throttle application at apex / out of most corners. This was especially true leading to uphil corner exits, it was really just mash the throttle and wait for some TQ & HP.

After? MOAR POWAH fo' sho'! Drivability wasn't sacrificed (the BOE blower setups have very short intake runs) at all, in fact BOE's ECU tunes offer, arguably, better drivability. Cam changeover was even lower on the rev range and a more gradual transition at that. One thing is for certain, I have to be MUCH MORE judicious with throttle application out of the turns. No more mash-it WOTs but much more roll-on / into WOT, although this can be done rather quickly for some corners.

As has been somewhat explained earlier in this thread, as a rule of thumb, belt driven superchargers tend to do their business relatively quickly off the line (i.e. at lower revs) and very linearly, adding low-end torque vs. high-end power. Exhaust driven turbochargers, depending on size, design and implementation can be more abrupt, or "peaky," in the way they deliver power. If you're interested in rather thorough discussions of either type of system, Corky Bell's Maximum Boost and Supercharged! are great reads.
 

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I have a 2005 Elise that I added a BWR blower to. Before the install the car was fine but I really disliked the sudden cam change.......it's kind of fun the first few times if you are going straight but otherwise it's a bit of a PITA.

I wanted more power so I added a BWR unit. I did not really know what to expect in terms of power delivery and drivability and was very pleasantly surprised. There is of course much more power but the surprise is how linear it is. It feels like it's just a bigger N/A engine and there are no lumps in the delivery.

I find it to be easier to drive hard than the stock set up even though it has 60 hp more.

This winter I hope to upgrade the system with the intercooler - should be fun.

dave
 

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Gamera The Atomic Turtle
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As everyone has said, you will improve the car's driveability with the charger installed. The BOE setups feel like "factory".
 

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An intercooled setup definitely takes a bit of throttle response away, but it's not that bad. The extra bottom end, and being able to pull higher gears through certain corners, more than makes up for it. Most Elise setups are based heavily on the Exige S, which is good enough to suffice for Lotus to sell. They're definitely not cobbled together, piggy back systems.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Mine is a 2005 Rev300 (TVS blower).

Before? LOVED the abrupt cam changeover (although, my changeover point was lowered to high 5000s RPMs, vs. Low 6000s while I was still NA) and I didn't need to be terribly judicious with throttle application at apex / out of most corners. This was especially true leading to uphil corner exits, it was really just mash the throttle and wait for some TQ & HP.

After? MOAR POWAH fo' sho'! Drivability wasn't sacrificed (the BOE blower setups have very short intake runs) at all, in fact BOE's ECU tunes offer, arguably, better drivability. Cam changeover was even lower on the rev range and a more gradual transition at that. One thing is for certain, I have to be MUCH MORE judicious with throttle application out of the turns. No more mash-it WOTs but much more roll-on / into WOT, although this can be done rather quickly for some corners.

As has been somewhat explained earlier in this thread, as a rule of thumb, belt driven superchargers tend to do their business relatively quickly off the line (i.e. at lower revs) and very linearly, adding low-end torque vs. high-end power. Exhaust driven turbochargers, depending on size, design and implementation can be more abrupt, or "peaky," in the way they deliver power. If you're interested in rather thorough discussions of either type of system, Corky Bell's Maximum Boost and Supercharged! are great reads.

Thanks for the tip on the Maximum boost thread. I'll be sure to read it.
Are the BOE and sector 111 superchargers roughly the same as far as HP and drivability? It seems like a lot of people buy the BOE unit.
The car I'm looking at has a sector 111 supercharger installed at their shop.
Thanks....
 

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There are 3 superchargers which are principally used on U.S. Elise cars.
Factory is a MP45 on the Elise. (218 HP)
Factory is a MP62 on the Exige. (218 to 258 HP, depending on tune and intercooler from factory)
Aftermarket superchargers are MP62 (Katana, Katana2, and others)(218 to 300 HP depending on tune, Intercooler and other components)
BOE also offers the TVS1320, which is used on some of the higher powered installations. (300HP non-intercooled, more with intercooler and other beefier components)
The TVS1320 is a newer design, which for a given boost, has a lower temperature for the boosted air coming from it. There are a few 400+ HP intercooled installs using the TVS1320.
 
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