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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I knew I would eventually have a continuation of my initial build thread:

http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f157/build-paddleshift-sequential-125777/ ….

I just didn’t think it would be so soon. But the inevitable happened; valve train failure. The motor was stock, so it was really only a matter of time.

Time to turn lemons into lemonade!

Engine removal was uneventful. This was the first time I had removed the clams. Easy enough with two people. Having now removed them, I wish I had done it when I did the sequential transmission work. So much easier to work on everything. Definitely worth the extra time to remove.












With the engine out and on a stand I removed the various accessories and sensors, wrapped up the motor in plastic, and strapped it to a pallet for shipment. Off it went to Kris at DRS.




Engine disassembly confirmed the valve failure in cylinder one. The other three cylinders looked great with no signs of detonation. Cylinder one combustion chamber looked like someone beat it with a ball peen hammer. And unfortunately the cylinder wall was too far gone from the valve pieces grinding into it to have any core value on the block. A real shame….





The Motor Itself
With that, we decided to start with a brand new Toyota block. We chose Cosworth 12:1 forged pistons, Cosworth Lightweight H-Beam connecting rods, and a Cosworth head gasket, a lightened, polished and balanced crankshaft, Calico coated bearings, and ARP bolts. I also had Kris build out a new ported and polished head with Eibach springs, Ferrea valves, and Piper stage 3 cams. Then topped it off with DeatschWerks 550 injectors. I already had a BWR lightweight flywheel from the prior build. With it, and the other light weight internals, the motor should rev up quickly...


The Oiling System
I did not want to spend all the time and all this money building a motor just to have the internal oil pump gears give way, so I decided to implement a dry sump system. There are not too many options out there for the 2ZZ and each have their individual strengths and weaknesses. In the end I decided to go with the Peterson pump with custom pulleys and mounting bracket from BOE as well as BOE’s pan. The pan is well designed and constructed.








I wanted a taller oil tank with more capacity than what came with Phil’s system, so I ordered a 2 gallon Peterson tank. The big challenge with that was where to mount such a large tank. Phil’s tank is a bespoke unit that fits neatly to the front right engine bay. Not enough room for mine in that location as it’s 20” tall.



The vent tank



My preferred location was the front left section of the engine bay.
In order to get the tank in that position and low enough, I had to do some mods to the coolant hard line that comes from the heater core. After cutting off the 90 degree bend in the hardline, I was able to get the tank nice and low. I fabricated some brackets, mounting them to the motor mount attachment. Solid as can be.




Some More Rearranging
Knowing I would have some time while waiting for the motor to return, I decided to do some housekeeping. The first was to remove the A/C system, since the dry sump pump resides where the A/C compressor sits. Not too bad of a job. I left the main hard lines that run from the rear to the front in the car. Too much trouble to try and remove those. And I could always use them at a later time as a wire conduit, if the need arose.

With some extra room under the front clam now that the A/C was removed, I fabricated a mount to relocate the battery from the trunk to the front, with access through the clam’s access panels. I went with the Deka ETX20L. Less than ½ the weight of the stock battery. It was an easy mod since there is already a battery cable running to the front of the car. I also installed a battery cut-off switch on the passenger side interior panel and a battery tender hook-up under the passenger clam access panel to ensure long life.






I am going to use BOE’s ITG intake, so I had to relocate the sequential shifter compressor to the passenger side of the engine bay and the air tank to the trunk in order to make room.



Next was to remove the front oil coolers and lines. With the dry sump system, I did not want to try and pump the oil 27 ft. around the vehicle to cool it prior to going into the motor. So I decided to go with a Mocal Laminova oil cooler in the engine bay.



With the tall 2 gallon oil tank and the Laminova, it would be plenty to cool the oil. Removing the oil cooler radiators from the front was easy enough. But removing the oil lines in the sills were a pain. Had to open up the interior door sill covers to get to where Lotus zip tied the oil lines in the front. Once those were cut, it took two of us to pull the lines out through the back, one up front pushing on the lines, while the other was in the back pulling on them.

Now with the oil coolers gone, I took advantage of the available openings in front and fabricated some cooling ducts for the front brakes. I used some off-the-shelf inlets that tapered to 3 inch ducts. I then fabricated the exits out of some 3 inch pipe I had lying around, attached a mounting plate which then mounted directly to the uprights. Simple and secure.



My vehicle came from the factory with the 4 pot AP Racing calipers in the front and the standard single pots in the rear. I decided to install the standard Lotus 2 pot front calipers in the rear to replace the single pot calipers. This entailed getting the front brake re-locator brackets, which installed easily. Since this is also a street car, I did not want to lose my parking brake. That meant having to keep the original single pot caliper in place, as it has the mechanical parking brake within it. Lots of unsprung weight with both of these calipers installed. So I did some research and found Frank Jakos who has fab’d a lightweight bespoke parking brake for the Elige. A really nice bit o’ kit. It is solely a mechanical parking brake, all aluminum at about 1/3 the weight of the stock caliper. And it’s cool looking as well.








The vehicle has the stock Ohlins 2-way adjustable dampers. I had changed out the springs with 550/800 a few months back, from BWR. The stock springs were 325/425. To get the car settled on the track, I was adjusted to the very limit of the stock valving. With the car on the lift for a while, it was the perfect opportunity to send them off to Ohlins in North Carolina to have them revalved. Now I have much more room for adjustment.

Then I moved on to adding an oil pressure and oil temperature gage. I went with the Spa Technique unit, as it has both pressure and temperature in a single gage. The gage also has a warning light that you can set to come on if it encounters low pressure. With the dry sump pump belt being a possible point of failure, I wanted this light to be easily visible. So I mounted it in one of the HVAC vents. A perfect fit.




Well, until the motor arrives I am at a stand-still…. But more to come…. Stay tuned….
 

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Great thread.

Would be interested in why you went for a 7.5 litre oil reservoir. To allow plenty of volume for the Capuccino to settle? Would have thought that a few litres + a separator would do the job with decreased weight and in less space.

Should the shift actuator be close to the box? (Sorry, cancel that question, I am confusing my build threads)

If you dont have an oil cooler on the sequential, you could now do the combo Laminova setup as per Jaimie instal.

What oil filter setup are you using?

Can you post a link to the spot rear calliper?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would have thought that a few litres + a separator would do the job with decreased weight and in less space.
Good question. I spent a lot of time researching this portion of the build as it had the least info readily available. I spoke on the phone with Peterson, Bill Dailey, and ARE about dry sump systems overall and their opinions. The ONLY thing they all agreed on was that the oil tank should be as tall as you could fit. The height was more important than the qty. They all said for this application they would rather see a tall 2 gallon tank used before a short 3 gallon tank. That is not to say a shorter tank would not work just fine, as there are plenty out there in service.


If you dont have an oil cooler on the sequential, you could now do the combo Laminova setup as per Jaimie instal.
I had read a thread on that and considered it. But in speaking with Fred at BWR, who is running more power than me, the temps in the Quiafe are not that extreme... so am holding off for now.

What oil filter setup are you using?
Stock location, different sandwich plate (from BOE).

Can you post a link to the spot rear calliper?
Frank's contact info for the caliper: roverstuff "at" comcast "dot" net
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Engine is done and should be should be shipping in the next couple days...

Knife edged crank





Ported and Polished Head



Cosworth Pistons






As Tom Petty said, "the waiting is the hardest part".....
 

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Any particular reason you didn't go with the Dailey unit with the built in centrifugal oil/air separator stage?
 

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I looked at Daily, Aviad, ARE, and Peterson before picking Peterson for our kit. I did use Aviad for a year before calling it a day:rolleyes:. Daily has a fine rep, no doubt... but Peterson still seems to be the leader with their tanks/pumps and they're about the only ones (if not, -the- only ones) that have roots pressure stages (my understanding is that they have a patent on it). Several have moved to roots scavenge, but most are all still running gerotor or spur gears on the pressure side. The roots design being more efficient than the spurs or gerotor...

All in, for our Peterson based setup (arguably some of the best DS components you can get), you're sub $4K (includes plumbing, pan, gears, brackets, belt, etc). It's been ran on both world challenge cars, mine, Fred's XP, and others... The 2ZZ daily setup is surely a fine setup, but at 5K for the pan/pump and then still need plumbing and a tank, etc, you're more than 6K into it... Can't speak for the OP, but if dollars are any consideration, there's a $2K savings to not go with the daily rig...

-Phil
 

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re: Dry Sump

I am a big believer and user of dry-sump systems for tracked cars.

I used SCP/Weaver Brothers on American Iron and ARE on my Elige/Honda.

I think, for a small 4-cylinder with tight oil passage clearances, most reputable pumps will do. Internally, they are very similar. The machining and avaialbility is the primary concern.

Aviaid is the only one that has spotty reputation....

Daily is a boutique. There are a few others. Most NASCAR teams use very specialized pumps and the brand seems to change. They run large motors with loose clearances. ) So lots of oil! My Weaver pump had 1.5" pressure stage!

Peterson is nice. It is not boutique like Daily, nor is it considered the top brand. It is more than sufficient for us and the price is right!

I think some other manufactures are coming out with roots stages. I thought roots was good for scavenge and gerotor for pressure...
Again for us, this is an academic philosophical discussion.

ARE has a built-in air separator. ARE holds this pattern.

I think Peterson has the best and most versatile drive pulleys and belts. They have the best price/performance.

Anton


I looked at Daily, Aviad, ARE, and Peterson before picking Peterson for our kit. I did use Aviad for a year before calling it a day:rolleyes:. Daily has a fine rep, no doubt... but Peterson still seems to be the leader with their tanks/pumps and they're about the only ones (if not, -the- only ones) that have roots pressure stages (my understanding is that they have a patent on it). Several have moved to roots scavenge, but most are all still running gerotor or spur gears on the pressure side. The roots design being more efficient than the spurs or gerotor...

All in, for our Peterson based setup (arguably some of the best DS components you can get), you're sub $4K (includes plumbing, pan, gears, brackets, belt, etc). It's been ran on both world challenge cars, mine, Fred's XP, and others... The 2ZZ daily setup is surely a fine setup, but at 5K for the pan/pump and then still need plumbing and a tank, etc, you're more than 6K into it... Can't speak for the OP, but if dollars are any consideration, there's a $2K savings to not go with the daily rig...

-Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Any particular reason you didn't go with the Dailey unit with the built in centrifugal oil/air separator stage?
I was confident in both solution's capabilities. In the end, as Phil indicated, it came down to cost. The nice machined billet pan with integrated pump of the Dailey was just not worth the extra $2K to me.

-David
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The motor has arrived… happy days once again…



Kris sent over some photos of the components used:










The basic motor installation was fairly uneventful… The only issues really came when running the oil lines for the dry sump. The packaging of everything in the engine bay is just so cramped. But it all worked out.






















Phil at BOE made a custom connector with MAF sensor for my new ITG intake, since it is now offset from the throttle body.



I ordered a set of intercooler tubes from Really Light Stuff. Thomas really went the extra mile to get them overnight shipped to me during the Holiday. Great customer service! Thanks again Thomas.

Here are a few more photos:












The engine break-in was uneventful. Kris had provided his recommended break-in procedure which included some 50% throttle pulls to 4K, 5K, and 6K rpm… decelerating in gear to create high vacuum. Then repeating with 100% throttle while keeping AFRs below 12. This was done with Motul 10-40 Break-in Oil. Once complete, I changed out the oil and filter and tomorrow will pull the plugs for review and check compression.

Next week it is off to the dyno for tuning…..
 

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Loving the progress on this build!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Where exactly did you get the parking brake from? I've been interested in a solution like this for a while but can't seem to find anything.
I got them from Frank Jakos. They installed in 10 minutes. No modification required. They work great.

You can reach him at: roverstuff at comcast dot net
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
It has been a long road since I began this engine rebuild... but I am finally back together and running. I want to thank Phil (BOE) again for his assistance along the way. He was always willing to talk on the phone and provide guidance as needed.

The past couple months have been just one issue after another, starting with a dry sump pump failure from some sort of trash that got into the inlet side from the tank which froze up the pump. Fortunately I wasn't on track and I saw the oil pressure indicator light up, and got the motor shut down quickly. So, I installed inline filters to keep that from happening again, had the pump rebuilt, and reinstalled.



Then an issue with no cam advance, which turned out to be a frozen cam gear. Removed it, got it fixed and reinstalled.


So FINALLY I got it on the dyno. I decided to keep things conservative to ensure longevity of this motor. I am very pleased with the torque curve obtained. I used a Dyno Dynamics load based dyno for the tuning. Makes the job so much easier. Took a long day to nail down the tune. But am pleased with the results.
 

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Great thread, thanks for sharing your experience.
 
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