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Discussion Starter #1
go here;
Group Lotus PLC ®

pick lotus cars and then USA

notice the pop up that states you are about to enter a local importer's site and we have nothing to do with it.

so I looked up the domain name;
Domain name: lotuscars.com
Registrant Contact:
Group Lotus PLC
Group Lotus PLC Group Lotus PLC ()
Fax:
Potash Lane, Hethel, Norfolk
Norwich, UK NR148EZ
GB
Administrative Contact:
Group Lotus PLC
Group Lotus PLC Group Lotus PLC ([email protected])
+1.7703390860
Fax: +1.7703390860
Potash Lane, Hethel, Norfolk
Norwich, UK NR148EZ
GB
Technical Contact:
Group Lotus PLC
Group Lotus PLC Group Lotus PLC ([email protected])
+1.7703390860
Fax: +1.7703390860
Potash Lane, Hethel, Norfolk
Norwich, UK NR148EZ
GB
Status: Locked
Name Servers:
ns.rackspace.com
ns2.rackspace.com


my arse lotus group has nothing to do with it.

I am calling lotus tonite and seeing if I can break this strangle hold that has 2005 lotuses going for 45K in canada. (dealers still make money on parts+service)

RIV canada and transport canada said if the manufacturer just gives them the specs they cannot see why they cannot let them thru.
 

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I think Group Lotus owns the domain name and the rights to the content on the site, but turned responsibility for developing the site and promoting the cars in the U.S. to the U.S. importer. The old site was pretty bad, and I remember Lotus U.S. talking about wanting to rework it...

John
 

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Good luck!!!!! :wallbang::wallbang::wallbang:

The problem is the same as the solution "a 2005 lotus selling for 45K".

What I mean by this is the idiots like myself (already own a CDN car) will loose 25-40% of the value overnight if you are successfull. On the otherhand I'll be able to afford the Exige I've always wanted.

Keep us posted.

Cheers........Phil
 

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45K In Canada = 35K US $
 

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2005 Lotus CANNOT be imported into Canada privately. None of the Elise or Exige's models can. I went throught the process to try. Transport Canada publishes a list of qualifying cars availible through their web site. The Lotus Elise/Exige is not on the list. Therefore you have to get a letter of compliance to Canadian Standards to have a car not on the list imported into Canada. The 2006/2007 Elise requires three modifications. Daytime running lights, Clutch interlock and metric speedo dials. The 2005 elise requires a different headlight setup (Sealed Beams) in addition to these. I know, I talked to Lotus USA and Lotus in England. They unnofficially gave me the list of modifications that would be required. What they would not give me and what they will not give anyone is the letter that says that if these modifications are done they will certify the car to meet Canadian requirements, and without that Transport Canada won't allow the car into the country. What is really happening is Lotus is price protecting the three Canadian dealers from lower priced cars comming in from the U.S. That is not speculation. The owner of the dealership in Vancouver told me so. There are three authorised dealers in Canada and they are protected by Lotus. The only Elise/Exige allowed into Canada from the U.S. are track cars that will be used exclusivly for competition and you must get a letter from an approved sanctioning body such as SCCA or SCCBC saying so. Sorry but it has beed tried before. You can probably get the car accross the border on a trailer, perhaps get it across with U.S. plates if you have a U.S. address to register it to and keep the U.S plates for a while however eventually they will catch up and you will have a very pretty driveway queen. If you want to give it another try though the contacts are - Ron Mann Lotus USA - Warranty Manager [email protected] or Dave Massey [email protected]
 

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When I paid $49,000 for my 06 Elise the Canadian dollar was basically equal to the US and 06's were selling in the US for 30-35k.

Now with the dollar at 20%, plus taxes, duty, fees, and shipping an 06 US Elise for 30k is going to run you 40k+.

Last month at auction an 06 ran through Toronto for 36...

There is maybe a slight difference when you do the math and 05's don't exist in Canada. Exige's are a different story, our prices are insane.

When the dollar is equal, like it was 8 months ago there was a lot of interest to import Lotus and Lambo's from the US. Lambo's are now allowed.


As said before Lotus is restricting importation to protect dealers and owners. If a flood of cheap Exige's were to enter Canada our dealers would not sell cars. If our dealers don't sell cars they go out of business. If they go out of business we no longer have a place for warranty service and would have to drive south of the border.

A dealership can't survive on service alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It just burns my a** that a dealer in vancouver can sell a 2007, a 2 yr old car for a couple of grand off a 2009.

Thanks for the input,maybe I should look at the bright side, I can buy a 2009 , have it for 3yrs put 60k on it and sell it for a couple of grand less than a 2011. where as every other car, loses 40-50% of the value.

if this is the case then the lotus is the only car that doesnt depreciate.
 

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What if you are a US citizen relocating to Canada with an Elise purchased in the US? Any special exceptions that anyone knows about?

I am relocating to Toronto this summer. I would hate to have to leave the car behind.
 

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What if you are a US citizen relocating to Canada with an Elise purchased in the US? Any special exceptions that anyone knows about?

I am relocating to Toronto this summer. I would hate to have to leave the car behind.
I don't think so. I know of at least one person who relocated to Toronto and kept his car registered in the US at a US address. Not sure what implications this has for insurance or what digging he did to see if there were any exceptions.
 

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Yes, I am currently planning to keep it registered in the US. But if you can put me in touch with someone in my situation, it may help. Thanks again.
 

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What if you are a US citizen relocating to Canada with an Elise purchased in the US? Any special exceptions that anyone knows about?

I am relocating to Toronto this summer. I would hate to have to leave the car behind.
I was offered a job in Vancouver a few years ago and asked a lot of the same questions. If I recall correctly, they frown upon this sort of thing, but I don't know how hard they go after it.

some laywer said:
If you are in Canada most of the time and are keeping the car in Oregon because you fly down or take a bus or AMTRAK for a couple of days a month and leave the car there for that purpose and only bring it back for the summer (then you are a resident of Canada and can NOT drive the car in Canada without importing it (which requires you to go through an export process first to avoid a $500.00 US fine). I have two teachers who teach in the US and spend their summers in Canada and their situation would just about match yours.
 

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The solution is simple. Set up an LLC, register and insure the car to the LLC, and keep it at the physical address of the LLC at least 183 days per year (November through May, minus any additional time you can sneak in between, say when flying out of Buffalo for a couple weeks). Document the hell out of everything.
 

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Elastic demand for ELise, I think Lotus would make more money if they sold more at a lower price- but not the dealerships.
I may have to get a Mosquito kit helicopter and a license instead-cheaper!
Oh, wait, the wife. . .
 

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Just 5 more years and you should be able to bring in a 2005 as it'll be 15 years old.
 

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You have to sign an affidavit saying you won't try to street register the car, but you do not need an affiliation with a racing body, at least I didn't when I imported my 211.


2005 Lotus CANNOT be imported into Canada privately. None of the Elise or Exige's models can. I went throught the process to try. Transport Canada publishes a list of qualifying cars availible through their web site. The Lotus Elise/Exige is not on the list. Therefore you have to get a letter of compliance to Canadian Standards to have a car not on the list imported into Canada. The 2006/2007 Elise requires three modifications. Daytime running lights, Clutch interlock and metric speedo dials. The 2005 elise requires a different headlight setup (Sealed Beams) in addition to these. I know, I talked to Lotus USA and Lotus in England. They unnofficially gave me the list of modifications that would be required. What they would not give me and what they will not give anyone is the letter that says that if these modifications are done they will certify the car to meet Canadian requirements, and without that Transport Canada won't allow the car into the country. What is really happening is Lotus is price protecting the three Canadian dealers from lower priced cars comming in from the U.S. That is not speculation. The owner of the dealership in Vancouver told me so. There are three authorised dealers in Canada and they are protected by Lotus. The only Elise/Exige allowed into Canada from the U.S. are track cars that will be used exclusivly for competition and you must get a letter from an approved sanctioning body such as SCCA or SCCBC saying so. Sorry but it has beed tried before. You can probably get the car accross the border on a trailer, perhaps get it across with U.S. plates if you have a U.S. address to register it to and keep the U.S plates for a while however eventually they will catch up and you will have a very pretty driveway queen. If you want to give it another try though the contacts are - Ron Mann Lotus USA - Warranty Manager [email protected] or Dave Massey [email protected]
 

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The main reason the Federal USA Elise/Exige/Evora is not admissible into Canada is that they do not meet current Transport Canada regulations for bumper speed requirements.

Here is an excerpt from the Transport Canada website outlining the differences in the current USA and Canada bumper regulations:-

Description and rationale

Canada and the United States introduced safety standards for bumpers in the early 1970’s. When the Canadian and the United States safety standards were originally introduced, they were harmonized with a test speed of 5 mph (8 km/h) for front and rear impacts and 3 mph (4.8 km/h) for corner impact tests. However, in 1979, the United States added more stringent requirements that included cosmetic damage criteria, while maintaining the original test speeds and safety components damage protection requirements. In 1982, the United States reduced the test speeds to 2.5 mph (4 km/h) for front and rear impacts and 1.5 mph (2.4 km/h) for corner impacts, and maintained their cosmetic and safety damage requirements.

In 1983, when the Canadian government proposed an amendment to harmonize the test speeds with those of the United States (i.e., 4 and 2.4 km/h), many Canadian stakeholders, such as the public, provincial and territorial governments, media and the insurance industry, were against the proposed test speed reduction. As a result the harmonization of test speeds was not pursued; thus for the past 26 years Canada has had a unique higher speed bumper test requirement for passenger cars.

These higher test speeds have resulted in some vehicle models not being available to Canadian consumers. In addition, there have been some vehicles sold at the retail level in the United States that have been inadmissible for importation into Canada as they have not met the Canadian bumper requirements.

Manufacturers are presently more concerned with the ability to design vehicles capable of meeting both the unique higher Canadian test speeds and future pedestrian safety requirements that are being developed internationally, rather than the limitation of vehicle models available on the Canadian market. The global technical regulation for pedestrian safety is aimed at reducing pedestrian fatalities by requiring that the front upper portion of vehicles be designed to reduce head contact forces when a pedestrian strikes the vehicle. This is accomplished by providing space between the vehicle’s exterior parts, such as the hood and upper fenders, and the solid structure of the vehicle, such as the motor or frame. In addition to reducing head injuries, the Global Technical Regulation on pedestrian safety will require that bumpers be designed to reduce lower leg injuries.

Most manufacturers have expressed the concern that a conflict exists in meeting the requirements of the three existing safety standards, ECE regulation 42, Canadian safety standard 215, and title 49, part 581 of the Code of Federal Regulations of the United States. As the European and Canadian requirements are aimed at improving safety, the intention at the time of introduction of the requirements was to protect the safety equipment of the vehicle, such as the lights, from damage in a low speed collision. The intention of the current United States bumper standard is to prevent or reduce physical damage to the front and rear of passenger cars in low-speed collisions, while protecting the hood, trunk, grill, fuel, exhaust, and cooling systems as well as safety related equipment such as parking lights, headlamps and tail lamps in low speed collisions. Manufacturers have noted that from a design standpoint, there is a conflict between meeting the no damage requirement of the United States, the higher test speeds in Canada with no damage to the safety systems and the need for bumpers to be designed to meet the requirements of the impending global technical regulation for pedestrian safety. Manufacturers have indicated that it will not be possible to meet all three requirements at once. Further, most manufacturers have suggested that they would be able to meet the United States lower speed and no damage requirements and the pedestrian safety requirements with one design.

This amendment will have a positive impact on international trade, as the Canadian requirement for bumper testing is the same as the requirements in Europe and the United States. This amendment will assist Canada with its obligation under the Global Agreement, made under the auspices of the UNECE. Canada’s commitment to review the Canadian bumper test speeds was noted in the summary document of the Global Technical Regulation working group on pedestrian safety that is available at the following site UNECE Information Service - UNECE ps-186e.doc.


It was actually quite fortunate that Lotus bore the cost of re-engineering the Federal standard bumper structure designs and submitted vehicles to Transport Canada for testing (to destruction)to get the models able to be legally sold here, bearing in mine what a small market Canada is to the company.
 
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