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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
EDIT: 15178 is the wrong T-stat for the Elise. 15078 is the proper one. See post 12 for latest test results.


Going to replace thermostat when I do radiator replacement. Bought Duralast 15178, as I like the all metal design. Tested it and it opens at 200deg.
Any advise on which thermostat to use?

What about TRD 170deg?
http://www.monkeywrenchracing.com/product_info.php?cPath=41&products_id=1097

Dualast 15178:
 

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Is this metric water or SAE water? It makes a difference :D

I can't say what the difference would be. 170*F wont hurt anything. In general, there can be issues of going too low because the cars ECU will not come out of cold mode, but thats usually a fear with the 160*F tstats. 170*F should be enough away from that threshold.
 

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from chatting to a few old racers it looks like 160 is where you trying to get max power out of the engine. 170 is a healthy temp for good power but better wear then 160, 180 is better wear life on the engine, 190 is best wear while not overheating the engine.

My race car i am aiming at trying to maintain about 170. Though i dont run a thermostat... just use duct tape to limit air flow to the radiator...
 

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Westrock,
After careful examination of the picture, noting the lack of color in the fluid, his geographical location (Milwaukee), the underdeveloped bubbles; I can only conclude it was a non-newtonian Isotonic solution, I.E. Milwaukee's Finest.
 

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I have a 170 thermostat in my stock NA 06 Elise.

Under normal driving I see somewhere between 173 to 180 in normal street driving, (non stop and go)

It does still heat up quicker than I would like in Stop and go. A normal stop light will be good for a 2 or 3 degree increase in water temp.

If I were to replace the thermostat again, I would probably with a stock 180 deg. Then I wouldnt see the digital gauge move 2 degrees and think "I need to do something about that".

Sorry, I forget the part number I used, but it was the AutoZone stocked brand with a 170 deg opening.


PS: I would not be comfortable with the t-stat opening at 200.
 

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Double check the calibration of your thermometers. At Milwaukee Wisconsin your elevation is about 670 feet, boiling point of water is about 210.5 degrees. Calibrate as needed by losening the nut under the dial and rotating it to a true reading. Bring your water to boiling (full boil) and measure your temperature halfway from the top to the bottom. Resting the thermometer on the bottom will give a false high temp. Also place your thermostat on top of something in the water, so it is not resting on the bottom. This method will give you the most accurate reading.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Double check the calibration of your thermometers. At Milwaukee Wisconsin your elevation is about 670 feet, boiling point of water is about 210.5 degrees. Calibrate as needed by losening the nut under the dial and rotating it to a true reading. Bring your water to boiling (full boil) and measure your temperature halfway from the top to the bottom. Resting the thermometer on the bottom will give a false high temp. Also place your thermostat on top of something in the water, so it is not resting on the bottom. This method will give you the most accurate reading.
I'll see what I can do, but I'm about 610' near Toledo Ohio. I figured if anything, thermostat resting on bottom would give a false low reading (as T-stat would be slightly hotter than water). Thermometers were held off bottom and T-stat for readings.
 

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The spring is the part which changes by temperature, not the body of the thermostat, but, you may be correct, it could give a false low.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Double check the calibration of your thermometers. At Milwaukee Wisconsin your elevation is about 670 feet, boiling point of water is about 210.5 degrees. Calibrate as needed by losening the nut under the dial and rotating it to a true reading. Bring your water to boiling (full boil) and measure your temperature halfway from the top to the bottom. Resting the thermometer on the bottom will give a false high temp. Also place your thermostat on top of something in the water, so it is not resting on the bottom. This method will give you the most accurate reading.

NEW RESULTS:
Calibrating the two thermometers (per above) gave me new readings...and hope. I now see an opening very need 190, maybe a tad lower. Ran until very open at 200. Fire turned off and T-stat went full closed very near 185.
After these results I have decided to use this T-stat. While none of this is very scientific, I feel better with these results.
Thanks for the tips, addertooth.

 

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No problem, worked in physics labs for about 13 years of my life, calibration is near and dear to my heart.
 

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I believe the fans kick on from a signal from the ECU. Either you can spoof it's temp sensor (which then has other negative effects), or have an external circuit which switches it on at a lower temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
The T-stat came from Autozone.
I'm not worried about when the fan comes on. With the new radiator and AC delete, I think it will work fine. Plus, if it comes much earlier it will be fighting with the T-stat.
And even with the AC out, I will still be able to trigger the fan manually with the AC button.
 

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so the Duralast 15078 unit is the one you are going with?
 
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