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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I where to lower the front of the car maybe a ¼ inch max (measured under the front suspension), what would be the outcome of the alignment? As in how would it be moved?
I assume there would be a bit less camber….yes/no?

What would happen to the toe? What else?....

I was (am) thinking about rising the springs a small amount up front (lowering the car) but I don’t know how this would affect the alignment and I don’t want to go get an alignment right now. If moving it the said amount will mess things up then I won’t mess with it until I go get a new alignment.

Thanks for whatever help.
 

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ride ht.

More exp. folks will advise about alignment changes, but if you want to lower the car's ride ht, you will want to lower the spring base, not raise it. The springs support the car body, etc., so to lower the car, you have to lower the spring location. 1/4 in. will have pretty min. affect on align. settings.
 

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If I where to lower the front of the car maybe a ¼ inch max (measured under the front suspension), what would be the outcome of the alignment? As in how would it be moved?
I assume there would be a bit less camber….yes/no?

What would happen to the toe? What else?....

I was (am) thinking about rising the springs a small amount up front (lowering the car) but I don’t know how this would affect the alignment and I don’t want to go get an alignment right now. If moving it the said amount will mess things up then I won’t mess with it until I go get a new alignment.

Thanks for whatever help.
You may want to check out this thread if you have the track pack: http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f91/lowering-track-pack-ride-height-even-further-58272/

If you don't there are a few threads about changing the ride height by cutting new grooves in the shock body (I think turbophil may have done this)

EDIT: Found Phil's thread: http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f91/what-do-you-get-lss-lathe-45291/

More exp. folks will advise about alignment changes, but if you want to lower the car's ride ht, you will want to lower the spring base, not raise it. The springs support the car body, etc., so to lower the car, you have to lower the spring location. 1/4 in. will have pretty min. affect on align. settings.
If you're adjusting the ride height by moving the top spring perch, you move the spring perch upward to lower the ride height. Changing the ride height has a significant effect on front toe settings, not much on other alignment settings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I forget offhand… are the adjustment rings on the top of the shock tube, above the springs, or the bottom?

But what ever… I know which way to go with it.

thanks though
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I thought they where above…that’s why I want to go up with the adjustment rings.

The car now has a bit of toe in up front if I remember right (can’t find my last alignment sheet). So what I was wondering most was how much this move would move the toe.
 

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I thought they where above…that’s why I want to go up with the adjustment rings.

The car now has a bit of toe in up front if I remember right (can’t find my last alignment sheet). So what I was wondering most was how much this move would move the toe.
As you lower ride height below stock height, the steering arms begin to become higher relative to the steering rack; that causes the tie rod ends to "pull" the steering arms in a bit, leading to more toe out.
 

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Slight increase in negative camber and slight toe-out will be the results. But if you're going to move it 1/4" or less for sure, I don't think the changes will be significant enough that you're need to run out and get an alignment right away.

xtn
 

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As you lower ride height below stock height, the steering arms begin to become higher relative to the steering rack; that causes the tie rod ends to "pull" the steering arms in a bit, leading to more toe out.
Technically that's called "Bump Steer". As you increase this problem ie. more bumpsteer as the car moves up/down on it's suspension, you will see more toe-in/out changes. Optimal to have zero bumpsteer for any given chassis ride height. Hard to adjust for this unless you can change the steering arm knuckle or height of tie rod attachement to the knuckle or wheel hub steering arm which changes the relative angle of the tie rods to wheel hub angle.:wave: Hope this helps you to visualize the situation.

PS. To a prior post, the stiffer the shocks, the faster the weight transfer diagonally across the chassis. The shocks only control the rate of roll for a given spring rate. Shocks don't change the spring rate.:nanner2:
 

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Slight increase in negative camber and slight toe-out will be the results. But if you're going to move it 1/4" or less for sure, I don't think the changes will be significant enough that you're need to run out and get an alignment right away.

xtn
+1 for xtn's post

The end result will be more grip in front and possibly faster turn in. The only negative is that the front of the clam will be easier to scrape.
 
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