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Discussion Starter #1
I just changed rims on both rears and went from stock 7.5 inches width to 8 inches. I used my old Yokohama AD07s on the new rims, since they have a fair amount of tread left. I got the wheels back from the tire store today where I had them mounted and they don't seem to hold pressure very well. They look fine and don't have any obvious holes or gashes. Is this normal? Do I just have to give them time to conform to the different width, even if it is only half an inch?
 

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I just changed rims on both rears and went from stock 7.5 inches width to 8 inches. I used my old Yokohama AD07s on the new rims, since they have a fair amount of tread left. I got the wheels back from the tire store today where I had them mounted and they don't seem to hold pressure very well. They look fine and don't have any obvious holes or gashes. Is this normal? Do I just have to give them time to conform to the different width, even if it is only half an inch?
I would suspect the tires were installed poorly if they quickly leak down. Have you tried checking the valve stems and valve cores for leaks as well as the tire beads? You can do this easily by adding some dishwashing soap to some water and putting the mixture into an old spray bottle. Set the sprayer to the stream setting and with the wheel laying flat on the ground spray some soap/water onto the valve stem core with the cap removed as well as around the base of the valve stem. Also spray the soap/water around the rim to tire bead area and then stand back and wait for bubbles to appear. If the areas you sprayed start producing a steady stream of bubbles or start foaming, you have found the leak or leaks. Turn the wheel over and spray that bead as well. Once you have found all the leaks, mark their locations and take the wheels back to the tire shop to have them redone properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the tip. I'll try the spray bottle trick that later tonight. They lose about 2psi per hour, so it is a somewhat slow leak. And both tires have about the same rate of leakage. Which is what made me just suspect that this is normal for tires that have been on 7.5 inch rims for 2 years and then suddenly go to 8 inch rims. But, I am a tire newbie -- just one more thing I am learning because of this wonderful car.
 

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Thanks for the tip. I'll try the spray bottle trick that later tonight. They lose about 2psi per hour, so it is a somewhat slow leak. And both tires have about the same rate of leakage. Which is what made me just suspect that this is normal for tires that have been on 7.5 inch rims for 2 years and then suddenly go to 8 inch rims. But, I am a tire newbie -- just one more thing I am learning because of this wonderful car.
2 PSI/hour is a pretty big leak. You should have no problem finding them with the soap/water. I have a feeling the tires are not sealing well to the bead area due to their age and taking a set to the old rims. The shop that installed the tires should have applied some bead sealant to stop the leaks. Let us know what you find.
 

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I didn't know there was a sealant that could be used. I'll definitely bring this up with the installer if things don't fully resolve by tomorrow.

The installer is a reputable local shop that specializes in tires (although mostly for generic vehicles). I've used them before to flip and rotate my old Lotus wheels without any problems. When I brought the wheels home last night, they were both at 15psi, which I thought was odd, since I expected them to be inflated to ~30psi. Assuming they were inflated to around 30psi, this means they deflated 15psi in about 8 hours.

I inflated both tires to 30 psi last night and then checked them this morning (about 12 hours later). One was down to only 25 psi, while the other was down to 18 psi. At least the leakage is slowing somewhat. Do you think it will help or hurt if I inflate them fully and go for a short drive to get them to seat better?
 

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I didn't know there was a sealant that could be used. I'll definitely bring this up with the installer if things don't fully resolve by tomorrow.

The installer is a reputable local shop that specializes in tires (although mostly for generic vehicles). I've used them before to flip and rotate my old Lotus wheels without any problems. When I brought the wheels home last night, they were both at 15psi, which I thought was odd, since I expected them to be inflated to ~30psi. Assuming they were inflated to around 30psi, this means they deflated 15psi in about 8 hours.

I inflated both tires to 30 psi last night and then checked them this morning (about 12 hours later). One was down to only 25 psi, while the other was down to 18 psi. At least the leakage is slowing somewhat. Do you think it will help or hurt if I inflate them fully and go for a short drive to get them to seat better?
I doubt it will make much difference, but it won't hurt to drive on them. Just take it easy and don't push them hard. Yes, they do have a sealant that can be applied to the bead area to ensure a seal. It usually is not needed unless the rims have corrosion at the bead areas which I doubt is your problem. Did you get a good look at your tires before thay were put on the new wheels? It is possible when they were removed the beads were cut or torn by the tire machine. This happens quite often with low profile tires. Also did you check your valve cores to make sure they were tightened in all the way? It is not uncommon for a valve core to be loose after being replaced when the tire is installed and cause a leak. Again, the soap/water check will easily pinpoint these leaks.
 
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