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obviously not a stock Fit. Spoon Sports race car. I'm surprised the kart was only 1.39 g's (and the Williams F1 car less than that!). Somebody's not trying very hard...:shrug:
 

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obviously not a stock Fit. Spoon Sports race car. I'm surprised the kart was only 1.39 g's (and the Williams F1 car less than that!). Somebody's not trying very hard...:shrug:
I think they are just trying to focus on mechanical grip vs aero grip. An F1 car will do up to 5 g's, but that is almost all aero grip, which means it's speed dependent. I'm guessing they ran a skid pad test at low speeds where aero isn't much of a factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
obviously not a stock Fit. Spoon Sports race car. I'm surprised the kart was only 1.39 g's (and the Williams F1 car less than that!). Somebody's not trying very hard...:shrug:
Well, it is a F1 car but it's from 1983 (FW08C):



As for the Fit and Elise, the Elise is also modified (ForcedFed Performance) granted it's not full race car but still impressed by the little Fit. It's not even running on slicks: Honda Spoon Fit Passenger Wheel Photo
 

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You can't always assume a direct relationship between "newer" and "better" with F1 cars. The safety gods occasionally throw monkey wrenches into the equation to slow the cars down. Like when they abolished slicks, reduced engine size, etc.

That said, for any type of car, mechanical grip is almost entirely a factor of tire compound. One exception being karts where it's a factor of tire compound and how well the driver keeps the inside rear off the ground.

Also, I'd suspect the F1 car was affected by lack of speed (downforce) and lack of tire temp. I'd suspect the same thing (lack of heat in tires) of the kart.

On another note, where is the stupid "close" button for that annoying pop-over that blocks the top half of the list?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can't always assume a direct relationship between "newer" and "better" with F1 cars. The safety gods occasionally throw monkey wrenches into the equation to slow the cars down. Like when they abolished slicks, reduced engine size, etc.

That said, for any type of car, mechanical grip is almost entirely a factor of tire compound. One exception being karts where it's a factor of tire compound and how well the driver keeps the inside rear off the ground.

Also, I'd suspect the F1 car was affected by lack of speed (downforce) and lack of tire temp. I'd suspect the same thing (lack of heat in tires) of the kart.

On another note, where is the stupid "close" button for that annoying pop-over that blocks the top half of the list?
I know every year FIA tries to slow down F1 cars by new rules however, engineers seem to outsmart it every year. The current F1 running V8 with no traction/launch control are turning out faster lap times than when they were running V10 with traction/launch control couple years ago.

Back in the early 90s when Williams was winning with the FW15C, it was consider one of the most sophisticated F1 ever build however, even with it's active suspension and slick tires it's still no match to modern F1 cars.

This test is definitely testing tire/mechanical grip but it does prove modern gokart pulls more Gs at slow corner situation than a F1 car from the early 80s.

BTW next year slick tires are back in F1, can't wait to see them run.
 
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