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Although I just spent about 20 minutes searching for an answer, I couldn't find it. If anyone can let me know the proper torque for the bolts which hold the front calipers in place, it will help a lot. Thanks.

Also, why do the calipers need to be turned upside down while bleeding them to be sure there is no air trapped in the bottom mounted crossover tube? Fluid enters the caliper at the top on the inboard side, travels down the caliper to the bottom, crosses over to the outboard side, then back up to the bleed screw at the top of the outboard side. It seems to me that air trapped anywhere in the caliper would be pushed through the caliper during bleeding and out the bleed screw without having to turn the caliper upside down.

I've seen it mentioned several times that you need to invert the calipers during bleeding and I assume that to be true. But, it doesn't make sense to me. Can anyone explain it?
 

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Although I just spent about 20 minutes searching for an answer, I couldn't find it. If anyone can let me know the proper torque for the bolts which hold the front calipers in place, it will help a lot.
45 nm, I believe:
 

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It seems to me that air trapped anywhere in the caliper would be pushed through the caliper during bleeding and out the bleed screw without having to turn the caliper upside down.
It doesn't.. The cavity behind the pistons is large enough for air pockets to stay happily 'afloat' and in the top of the bore and remain there, irrespective of how much you flush..

But for a normal flush (just to replace the fluid when no air is in the system) then you don't need to do the whole invert trick. That's only needed when air has been introduced in the system (eg. when replacing brake lines)

Other AP calipers often have 2 bleed screws and connect the brakeline input to the back of the piston bore, so you can bleed each side separately and get air out that way.

Some Japanese Elise tuners sell a new connecting tube a the bottom of the caliper where the brake line is connected. The current connection is then replaced with a bleed screw to get the same effect.

Bye, Arno.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It doesn't.. The cavity behind the pistons is large enough for air pockets to stay happily 'afloat' and in the top of the bore and remain there, irrespective of how much you flush..
That explains it and now it makes sense. Thanks.
 
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