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Rec'd this msg from a friend. I don't know the answer, so help would be appreciated.


"My 94 porsche 968 racer uses its original OEM Torsen Type limited slip differential…..

With wheels unloaded on lift, should my torsen LSD diff act similar to open diff whereby opposite wheel does not turn when 1 wheel is rotated?

I believe a more traditional clutch type LSD will have opposite wheel rotate same direction…

I believe open diff may have opposite wheel rotate in opposite direction…

Can you confirm or clarify?"

TIA.

=gb=
 

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The Torsen will act like an open differential with both driven wheels off the ground. If you turn one the other will turn the opposite way. With a clutch pack type limited slip differential if you turn one wheel the other will turn the same way so you are correct.
 

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The Torsen will act like an open differential with both driven wheels off the ground. If you turn one the other will turn the opposite way.
Depends - is the transmission in gear? Actually with the trans in neutral, when you turn one wheel, the other wheel may turn the other way, on not turn at all (the input shaft turns instead), or some combination of the two. Bottom line is that you can not do any "turn the wheel" test to determine if a car has a Torsen or not.

With a clutch pack type limited slip differential if you turn one wheel the other will turn the same way so you are correct.
Only if the trans is in neutral. If it's in gear, you aren't going to turn a wheel in the first place. ;)


A Torsen has to have resistance to turning (i.e. some amount of traction), on both wheels, AND power being applied to the input or there is no "locking". A Torsen will act as an open differential under all conditions EXCEPT when power is being applied thru the input...
 
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