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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all- new owner here.

Just wondered if there was anything to keep in mind on the track that's particular to this car. I thought I saw a post a while back about keep on the gas through the turns, does the rear have a tendency to break loose? Anythign else I should know?

Any comments are appreciated!
 

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When the car comes around. It comes around QUICK. But if you keep your eyes far ahead, you can see it going wrong before your body feels it.

Brake only* in a straight line/do not apply brakes with the steering turned.
Don't slam but squeeze the brakes HARD and short, and be gentle with the release.
Be slow, but deliberate with steering/throttle inputs as not to upset the car.

Get a coach.

Here's what happens when you get off throttle in a turn.

and here's what happens when the input isn't deliberate enough during transition(at the end).
 

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Hi all- new owner here.

Just wondered if there was anything to keep in mind on the track that's particular to this car. I thought I saw a post a while back about keep on the gas through the turns, does the rear have a tendency to break loose? Anythign else I should know?

Any comments are appreciated!
Not sure how much advice you want... but this kind of question usually gets a lot. There are some good, and very long threads here discussing driving technique. Check them out. Also, the car prep threads with particular attention given to toe links, oil sump and fuel starve.

Start slow and get a good instructor, preferably familiar with these cars. If you are really new, I recommend some autocross seat time. It helps to learn how to stay ahead of the car mentally and not lift in corners. This is a basic to driving technique. If you start to lose the back end in a corner and lift off the gas, the rear goes light and you can spin. In an Elige, it can happen very, very quickly. Slow in / fast out is the way to work up closer to the limits. It is a very rewarding and fun car to track. Have fun.
 

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there is nothing particularly "odd" about the elise/exige as far as tracking / racing it. its a mid engine short wheelbase car... so, it transitions really fast! some times that means it loops on your really fast! or pushes, or both in the same corner.

i can't think of any car that you wouldn't want to be modulating throttle position into/through/ and out of apex. thats kinda the point... the rear really doesn't have a tendency to break loose, its just that its very easy to balance the car - which also means its very easy to input 'bad' balance. also, the car has plenty of power to power loop it in low speed corners

so what Jefrac said. when in doubt, late apex and early throttle. also what FMUscotty said - pressure on the brake and throttle modulation. your hands can be all over the place and thats ok as long as the momentum is going in the right direction all the time :)
 

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Lift On Turns You Spin
 

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Last question- recommended tires for the track?
Now you've opened a can of worms!

I think Toyo R1Rs or Hankook RS-3 are a good place to start - not as grippy as DOT race tires like Hoosiers or true slicks, but good enough to let you push the car. Other tires like R888s are good too, but the advantage of R1Rs or RS-3s is you won't be dangerous if you get stuck out in a rainstorm on the freeway.

Keep in mind that the grippier the tire, the more speed (and energy) you'll be able to carry through turns. That means things will happen more quickly and violently when they let go.

Some people here advocate less grippy "street performance" tires or even all-seasons for a first outing - if you already have some, that makes sense, but otherwise I think you're better off spending the money on sticky tires now because you'll want them after 2-3 track days.

If you do end up wanting a less sticky tire, I'd recommend Dunlop Z2 if you're comfortable with the sizes they're available in.

The OEM Advans (AD07 and A048) are both good tires, but are massively pricy compared to their competitors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, first track event is coming up first week of August at CA Speedway. I've got an instructor for the day. If I can find an AutoX before, then, i'll do it.

Not sure what tires are on the car right now, but if they're decent I'll probably just burn through them while I learn. Not many rain storms here in SoCal, so no worries there. :)

Thanks for the advice, I'm really looking forward to taking the car on the track- although cautiously!
 

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When the car comes around. It comes around QUICK. But if you keep your eyes far ahead, you can see it going wrong before your body feels it.

Brake only* in a straight line/do not apply brakes with the steering turned.
Don't slam but squeeze the brakes HARD and short, and be gentle with the release.
Be slow, but deliberate with steering/throttle inputs as not to upset the car.

Get a coach.

Here's what happens when you get off throttle in a turn.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67ONlwubS08

and here's what happens when the input isn't deliberate enough during transition(at the end).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhwTv7CwNMw

2nd video sound effects were very funny.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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I have only been to a couple track days with my car. All the important stuff has already been said but I would like to stress a couple things.

fitfan said it best. These cars are very easy to balance, which means you can input BAD balance very easily. Breaking in a straight line is hugely important, just as important as brake release. These cars (like many) do NOT like rapid brake release.

I have run on Dunlop Direzza Z2's with very good luck. It is a forgiving tire on a not-so-forgiving car. It makes for a nice affordable, long lasting balance. Your OEM pads will probably suffice for the first day, but expect to throw them in the garbage when you get home :) Unless you are looking to set fastest lap on your first day out with this car, I would recommend the Z2's. I just put two new rears on for my next event which is tomorrow.

My oil light came on a few times at really high revs in the Esses at Watkins Glen. I simply upshifted through there and never saw the light come on again. If you see the oil light flicker, it's best to run a gear higher to save your engine until you can get a baffled oil pan. I wish I had the money for a pan because it is one less thing to worry about and look for. I never had fuel issues because I kept the car pretty close to topped off.

You probably won't even need it, but bring a quart of oil, just in case. Check it between runs. Those Porsche guys add oil like they add gas to their cars. You'll be glad you have a Japanese engine.

Have fun! :)
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLJg7rM6hqA

video of my race last weekend at fontana. will give you a good idea of the track - although this is racing and my line is different depending on who is behind, or in front... of me. but you get the general idea.

i like the elise on the track with the AD07 (or watever that tire has now been replaced with - but the "base" tire) i think that is a very good tire to start on, its very progressive, communicates well, goes plenty fast.

'used' tires are fine but i wouldn't go to the track on dead tires...

make sure your pads are fairly fresh and flush the brakes and clutch

good tip on checking the battery hold down

torq your toe links!

keep the gas tank mostly full... and ask some of the lotus challenge guys about advice on insuring you have oil pressure all the way around the oval. (elisefreaks advice)

and i would consider seeking out someone local to help you align the car (at least a simple decent compromise alignment to verify nothing is evil)

the "roval" is one of those tracks you can run late apex early on the throttle. and run the track pretty safely. pretty forgiving is drive straight off under braking...

don't forget - you and only you are responsible for not balling up the car. do what the instructor says, but only to the limit of your comfort. its better to have the instructor yelling at you "dude, you really need to ... (whatever)" than to get towed into the pitts and have him explain how you really didn't do exactly what he was trying to tell you to do! lol. some instructors are have the "soft skills" to grasp your comfort and capability to execute... others may believe they can talk you around and 'instruct' you to do what they would do... you are the driver!

you'll have a blast!

if you can rent a garage... its quite nice thing to have.
 

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OK, first track event is coming up first week of August at CA Speedway. I've got an instructor for the day. If I can find an AutoX before, then, i'll do it.

Not sure what tires are on the car right now, but if they're decent I'll probably just burn through them while I learn. Not many rain storms here in SoCal, so no worries there. :)

Thanks for the advice, I'm really looking forward to taking the car on the track- although cautiously!
At the track, keep a close eye to the tire pressure/temperature. It varies depending on tires and driver's preference, but 26 PSI front 29 PSI rear HOT is a decent baseline pressure. You'll see the tire pressure getting really high especially by the end of the very first session, and you'll know because the car will start sliding from the tires getting "greasy".

At the end of the day after you're done with the track, don't forget the air back up because it'll never get up to the track pressure on a public road.

Get an alignment done, and if your suspension is adjustable get it corner balanced as well.
 

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For tires, there is a pretty large gap between UHP street tires and DOT slicks.
If you are planning to track a lot, it is well worth the money to buy a spare set of wheels and get some Hoosier or Hankook DOT slicks. There is also the option to get full Yokohama slicks, but they are $$$.

As far as driving manners, to me it is vitally important to remove all the camber shims in the front. If you do that the car has near perfect balance IMO. One thing I do not agree with that has been posted here is the 'never brake in a turn' thing. Once you get used to the car I think you will find that trail braking is just as useful as it is in any other car, in fact maybe a bit more since the car tends to understeer a little bit.
 
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