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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm expecting to purchase an Elise in a week or two, and it's currently in Florida. I'm in Oregon. The car has RE-71R's installed. Bridgestone says these tires should not be stored or used in temperatures below 40F. From a little online research, it seems like if the tires are stored at temperatures below 40F, they risk cracking, chipping, and blowing out when driven afterward.

After I purchase the car, how do I get it to Oregon without destroying the tires? The car will be in an unheated trailer for a 3,000 mile journey across the US in winter. They will be basically "stored" in likely freezing temperatures for probably a week or more. How can I ensure the tires will be ok to drive on when the weather warms up?

I really don't like the idea of allowing the tires to freeze, then swapping them out once the car gets here and storing them indoors the rest the winter, just expecting they survived the trip unharmed.
 

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Can you just coordinate with the seller to have the car shipped a little later? Spring is getting here quickly. I'm usually in the "eh, no big deal camp" but that's also why I like the less over-all grip of the Conti ECS. They also shouldn't be ran below freezing, but they can be used again when warmed back up, as per Conti, as long as you don't make them change shape at all during the low temperature state.
 

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I don't think its an issue; I don't think the transport will hit temps that low on the drive across the country.
 

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I don't think its an issue; I don't think the transport will hit temps that low on the drive across the country.
Depends on what stops they have along the way. If they detour through the midwest, temps will certainly be below freezing. They'll also have to pass over the Rockies.
 

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I store my RE71Rs on my car in the garage during the winter - definitely gets below freezing. I've not had a problem, but I wouldn't drive the car on them below freezing. I'd go for it, worse case is you'll have to replace the tires.
 

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As long as you aren't driving on the tires at the low temps you should be fine for getting the car off the truck and into the garage. From there you'll want them to warm up if you want to go for a drive otherwise throw some all season or winters on first and have fun.

The tires have definitely been exposed to the temps at some point in their life whether being transported cross country (or national if produced outside the US) etc
 

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As touched on above, maybe just have them over-inflate the tires a bit while it's sitting on the tow. I've been on track with my r888r when it's definitely been below 40F in the early mornings and later afternoon. You just have to take it easy until you feel the tires have warmed up.

Otherwise, I think you'll be fine. A lot of that stuff, (while true to an extent) is just lawyers covering their asses.
 

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Imagine a stick of chewing gum in a freezer. If you bend it, it will crack and break. If you let it warm up to room temp it will be pliable and undamaged. That is summer tire rubber, although the specific temp at which it turns to 'glass' depends on specific tire compounds, but generally anything under freezing is risky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd go for it, worse case is you'll have to replace the tires.
Hmm. I think the worst thing would be the tires having internal damage, then blowing out while I'm driving after I put them on in the summer.

I do agree with the sentiment of the tires being generally ok if you let them warm up gradually and not driving on them in the cold. However, the issue I'm concerned with is the cold ruining the molecular properties of the rubber, so that even after warming up gradually, there is damage I'm unaware of.

I think I'm probably going to just ship it, and as it travels, I'll keep an eye on the temperatures along the route. If it's not too long in the cold, I'll keep the tires.
 

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As long as you aren't driving on the tires at the low temps you should be fine for getting the car off the truck and into the garage. From there you'll want them to warm up if you want to go for a drive otherwise throw some all season or winters on first and have fun.

The tires have definitely been exposed to the temps at some point in their life whether being transported cross country (or national if produced outside the US) etc
Yeah I cannot imagine the guarantee "tires never frozen!!!" as an OEM selling point.

If you're that worried get the shipper to put a telatemp somewhere on the exterior of the car. I feel if it was that big of a deal to simply expose tires to low temperatures for a moment while stored then tires would have this shipped from new.

CT0C-D Descending Coldsnap Freeze Indicator I think you can get them in different temperatures, but if not, it's got to be better than figuring the temperatures your car was exposed to along the way and figuring time of day, etc. if that's truly your plan.

Congratulations on the purchase! I hope to see it some day and look forward to hearing about what you've picked up.
 

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Hmm. I think the worst thing would be the tires having internal damage, then blowing out while I'm driving after I put them on in the summer.

I do agree with the sentiment of the tires being generally ok if you let them warm up gradually and not driving on them in the cold. However, the issue I'm concerned with is the cold ruining the molecular properties of the rubber, so that even after warming up gradually, there is damage I'm unaware of.

I think I'm probably going to just ship it, and as it travels, I'll keep an eye on the temperatures along the route. If it's not too long in the cold, I'll keep the tires.
No, I don't think that's how dramatic this is. I only have a single data point to draw on, but still - I had R888s in Michigan and my garage would routinely get down into single digits. The tires felt very aged in the summer, like they just never could warm up and get gummy. Still, they gripped better than an all-season by a mile. They definitely lost pliability and grip, but they retained most of it and never blew out on me. They were also old and tracked before I bought the car.
 

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You haven't mentioned the date on the current tires. This is important because if the tires you're buying are over about 3.5 years old you'll want new tires anyway. 125 mph on tires that are unknowns isn't smart. When buying any used car one should be prepared with a few $ to make it right after the fact. So if you're buying a Florida car and shipping in Winter, the budget involves new tires one day. In the mean time you drive on the old tires but not over 60-65. Welcome to understanding what you've gotten into. If you'll store the car in a heated garage and someday new tires too then ignore what is said next..... Maybe buy some cheap wheels, remount the old tires on 'em and next Winter store the car on the old tires while you keep the newer tires stored inside. Driving your tires based on the luck others have had may be less expensive but is your life worth less than the price of a set of tires. A fellow who's won multiple SCCA National Championships expressed this attitude to me one day when I was going to go cheap on myself with a Formula car tire, never looked back or (more importantly) never had regrets because of tire failure since
 

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there are a few obvious choices.

1. Delay shipping until the temperatures are not a concern
2. Ship now and plan to replace the tires when the car arrives. Check tires before moving but they will likely survive the trip from the trailer to your garage.

Consider if your garage gets under 40*F each year. Its probably expensive to heat the garage all winter anyway, so you may need a set of tires (or hubstands) for storage anyhow. Putting the car on jackstands during the winter is not an option you should plan on.
 

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Is this an enclosed trailer?

I wouldn't be surprised if these tires make frequent trips in below freezing conditions in the back of an enclosed truck for distribution to suppliers, end users, etc...
 

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Is this an enclosed trailer?

I wouldn't be surprised if these tires make frequent trips in below freezing conditions in the back of an enclosed truck for distribution to suppliers, end users, etc...
If the 40F requirement was valid I'd be surprised if that was true from a legal liability standpoint, or even a "probably not good to have tires exploding in the news" standpoint. The tire shops I use have warming bays for type R tires, I wouldn't be surprised if this was mostly a non issue because people don't usually order R compound when there's snow on the ground anyhow.
 

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Can you share more on this? Assuming due to bushings, etc.

Cheers,
B
You hit the nail. bad for oem suspension bushings,

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 
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