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Discussion Starter #1
Hi--I need some help and not sure if this is a silly question.

I'm taking my wheels off for the first time on my 06 Exige I got a few months ago, and the front wheels come off fine (I think the drivers side was a little tight, but no problem)

With the rears, I have the lugnuts off and tried hitting the sidewall with my first (usually loosens things up on my Civic), but just cannot get these wheels off with a considerable amount of force. Is there something I'm missing or anyone else have this problem? I find it odd that both rear tires seem stuck in place...

Thanks....
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I should also mention that I have removed the lugnuts and lowered the tires back to the ground and up...usually this seems to pop the wheel off fine on my other car, but no dice here...
 

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...do you have wheel studs? When you take the wheelbolts off, the wheel should 'fall off'. The fact that you lowered the car back down with no wheelbolts on and nothing happened is somewhat puzzling to me.

Perhaps try applying a quick, jerking force to get them to pop off. But make dang sure you dont rock the car off the jackstands or pull so hard, the car falls on you. If that doesn't work, I'd take it to Discount or a tire shop you trust.

Alternatively, I've heard of guys putting a small 'chisel' like object between the wheel and mount, but I'd be too afraid to damage the wheel or car.
 

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What climate / region do you live in? Sounds like corrosion buildup.

A pic of the hub with all four lugs out would be useful. You might consider holding a block of wood against the lip and hitting with a rubber mallet. It really shouldn't take much force to free a bound wheel.


Sent from my Autoguide iPad app
 

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And the key question, are they stock wheels. Our wheels are hub-centric, some aftermarket wheel might not have the central hub dimension quite right. Otherwise, you are dealing with galvanic corrosion (aluminum/iron boundry), and may need to use one of the safer corrosion removing chemicals to break the funk away. This is more likely if the car was exposed to wet salt (ocean, winter driving up north).
 

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Loosen lug nuts, lift other side

I had the same problem (stuck Rear wheel) when I tried removing my wheels for the first time on my second-hand Elise. Here's what I finally did: Screw the lug nuts back on all the way, then unscrew about half turn, alowing your wheel a little play to get it loose. Then, SLOWLY jack the car up from the other side from the jack point in the middle, this will put diagonal force on the wheel and break the corrosion. You should hear a small "creak" once the wheel becomes loose, and then you can lower the car back down.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks to all those who replied...this is really good information, and looks like I'm not the only one! Every little job seems to turn into a big project when you just get the car, but at least it's still fun.

I've attached a picture of my rear wheel as well as the inside of my FRONT wheel for you all to see the level of corrosion.

The car spent most of its years in New Jersey; I'm in Chicago, but hasn't really been exposed to severe elements since I've had it.

I like the idea of raising the opposite side up to put a torque on the wheel. But I did impulse buy those large bright orange dead blow hammers from Harbor Freight recently, so maybe it'd be nice to try that out and say I've used it! :coolnana:

Seriously though, taking that idea one step further, I may put a piece of 2x4 under the inner sidewall area and then raise the other side. Maybe it'll put more force on it. But I'll try hitting it harder first since others have said this works. I just didn't want to hit it too hard without knowing what the issue could be.

Has anyone tried appying anti-seize compound when putting the wheel back on? Or is that just overkill?

Also, any recommendations for chemicals to remove the corrosion? I'm a little leary of messing up the enamel on the stock wheels if it comes into contact.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also I forgot to mention, these are just stock wheels with the standard 10 spline wheel bolts...I mistakenly said lugnuts :)
 

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moving the car forward or back with the bolt slightly loose will separate the wheel from the hub.

Dissimilar metals in contact cause a bit of corrosion.

Clean the hub area with a wire brush. Clean the wheel.

Yes, apply anti-seize to the hub where the wheel got stuck to it.


Let us know how it works out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks. I will try that next.

The dead blow hammer (3 in diameter) didn't work out..I hit the top edge/sidewall a good number of times, turning the wheel and hitting different points around the tire, being careful not to hit the body or get close to the wheel. I also tried lifting the car on the opposite end, as suggested, with the wheel bolts loose, which hasn't worked either. I didn't try my modified method of increasing the forces by putting a block of wood on the inner edge of the tire. to have this issue is nuts. I don't have a lot of experience with different wheels and all, but this almost seems like a design flaw, or just not meant for NJ elements. I'm not really sure when the wheels were last removed either since I got the car...

Lets see if rolling back and forth helps....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ah-ha! Got one rear tire off! :nanner:

I tried rolling it back and forth, but still no change.

Then I tried my dead blow hammer again and hit the tire from the inner side wall to hit the wheel out in the direction i want the wheel to come out. The tire was raised about an inch off the ground, so sliding the 3" diameter hammer against the ground gave me enough clearance to not hit the wheel, yet give it some good hits. On the first hit, I noticed the bottom of the tire move out ever so slightly. So I kept turning the tire and doing this and slowly nudging the tire out--the main thing was to keep turning the tire so that the hits keep rocking the tire out. I had to do this quite a lot...that wheel was on really tight! Probably after one to two dozen hits all around the wheel, the tire finally popped out.

So, in the future, I think this dead blow hammer is a useful tool. I'll get to the other rear tire tomorrow, but I'm sure it should work.

I will, as suggested by glb, spend a good amount of time using a wire brush to clean off all the corrosion--this wheel was like the picture I had above for the front tire, but quite a bit worse (had a lot more white residue).

I will finish off with a generous application of Permetex anti-seize to hopefully make things easier in the future!

Thank you everyone for all your quick responses and insight--much appreciated. :bow: I wouldn't have guess that much corrosion would have just seized the wheel on there.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
For completeness sake of this thread, I just wanted to mention the last tire came off with at least several dozen hits using the method I mentioned earlier.

I've attached pictures of the both sides of the last tire. And the problem is the corrosion on the inner hole of the wheel and what it fits against. It's a centimeter deep of corrosion all around, which to me explains why all the other methods didn't work as well. It was more than just knocking loose the corrosion. I basically had to hit the wheel all around to knock it out about 1 centimeter at least to get this thing loose.

I don't know a whole lot of history of the car, but this is quite a lot of corrosion! Maybe it was left out last winter or something, who knows. Lets see how long it takes to clean! I will definitely apply anti-seize to the inner ring of the wheel. I plan on taking very good care of this car, so I don't expect to see the problem come back to this extent.

Thanks again everyone.
 

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Impressive, makes me glad I live in the high desert.
 

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jesus christ.. that looks horrible.

you need to spend some time getting down and cleaning that, new rotors... sand the backs of the wheels... looks like crap.. i personally would never buy a vehicle that looked as corroded.. but some quality time you can bring it back.

key word, wire brush ;)


probably need to give the whole car a good once over... i'm so glad i live in florida.. might rain but at least we dont get salt and snow.
 

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Yikes! That is really creepy! Make sure to inspect your other hubs and suspension components.
 

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jesus christ.. that looks horrible.

you need to spend some time getting down and cleaning that, new rotors... sand the backs of the wheels... looks like crap.. i personally would never buy a vehicle that looked as corroded.. but some quality time you can bring it back.

key word, wire brush ;)


probably need to give the whole car a good once over... i'm so glad i live in florida.. might rain but at least we dont get salt and snow.
Hey - its not that grim!!! My wheels were half that bad when I removed them a couple of months ago (I've got the standard wheels) and I know where my car has been for the last 6 years! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the tips on the rotors. I wasn't planning on replacing them, but on second thought, it's always a good idea to start with some new brake parts. The pictures I think look worse than it really is...I mean it's still bad, but the green tint and pixelization make it a lot worse. I did spend a good amount of time with a wirebrush, steel wool and exacto blade to scrap off the corrosion on the inner hole of the wheel...man it was thick! No wonder the wheel was jammed in there. Now it goes on smooth. My friend recommended using paste wax over it rather than anti-seize...any thoughts?

The rest of the car doesn't look all that bad, apart from the A/C condensor, which has separated fins and a fair bit of corrosion--I'm on the look out for a new one; I dont think it's critical but as long as I'm puting in a new radiator, I may consider a new condensor. The shocks and springs look okay, apart from mild surface rust.

Overall, the car is in good shape, but my impression is that the owner treated it like a point A to point B car, and while didn't abuse it, didn't really care for the details either.
 

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My friend recommended using paste wax over it rather than anti-seize...any thoughts?
Don't use paste wax. It will just melt/boil away the first time the brakes get hot. Use proper anti-sieze.
 
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