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Discussion Starter #1
While out enjoying the boost-ability of my 91' Lotus Esprit SE yesterday, things went amiss. After downshifting to pass a car, my boost built up to a full gauge, and though I felt the effects of a normal boost cycle, the gauge held at about 3/4 boost for an additional 4-7 seconds. I enjoyed it while it happened, but then I knew something was wrong. My turbo was making a whistling sound, so I pulled over. In complete shock, I stepped out of my car to find that my radiator had blown a seal, and was discharging its contents.
I had the car towed, and hoped that the radiator had caused the noise. Turns out the turbo was in fact compromised, and coolant had got into chambers of the turbo it was not welcome...
having said all this, I need to replace/rebuild the turbo. I already had a radiator installed, and am now trying to see what the best (most inexpensive) route is since the radiator was 600 friggin bucks. I am open to rebuilding, replacing, or even improving at a reasonable price point.

I appreciate you guys, any and all advice is welcomed, Merry christmas!
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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6,107 Posts

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With a stock t3 turbo, does anyone recommend any upgrades to make? Maybe a ball bearing or something along those lines. Thanks. I've heard good things as well about majestic and turbo technics.


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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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6,107 Posts
See the links, above. ^^^


S2K gave a talk on Esprit turbos at the East Coast Lotus Meet in 2006. Updated designs have better bearings, and 'trim' can be tweaked to enhance performance.

Be prepared to spend some bucks, though. AFAIK You need to upgrade fuel delivery to make turbocharger performance upgrades worthwhile.
 

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I had good results with Turbo City in CA. A lot depends on how much damage has been done to the "hard parts", the housings and the impellers. Those parts get reused and if they have to be fixed or replaced it can get expensive. Any good shop replaces the bearings, shaft, and seals at a minimum and then balances the rotating assembly. Depending on the turbo, just doing that can cost over $600. They will also recommend you replace the oil feed hose to the turbo. You should also do an oil change because you may mixed the oil and the coolant. Turbo City phone # 714-639-4933
David Teitelbaum
 
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