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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Discussion Starter #1
As mentioned in other threads, we're on the hunt for a 2017+ Evora. I've been reading everything I can in preparation, and two of the topics that keep popping up are 1) oddly high quiescent current draw which can drain the battery in a couple of weeks, and 2) that you can be locked out of your own car if the battery sags too much.

Is #2 really true? When I first read that I presumed it meant the Evora doesn't have an external mechanical door lock - which seemed very unlikely. Scanning through the Owner's Manual again (which I have in PDF form, dated "15/08/2018"), I found a section entitled "To Lock Using the Key" on page 25. It shows a photo of an external mechanical door lock, so the Evora definitely has one. It also very clearly and explicitly says:

In the event of a discharged vehicle battery or an inoperative transmitter key the left hand door may be locked by using the key in the exterior lock barrel.

To Lock: Insert the key, turn fully clockwise, return to the vertical and withdraw.
Fine, that speaks to locking the door. But the very next sentence, under the same heading and using the same formatting, reads:

To Unlock: Insert the key into the lock, turn fully counter-clockwise, return to the vertical and withdraw.
This very strongly suggests to me that, as you'd expect, the mechanical door lock can always be used to unlock the door. To suggest otherwise would require that somehow the (electrical) alarm system can physically decouple the mechanical lock from the door latch. It's hard to imagine why that would be a good idea, and easy to imagine why it could be a very bad one.

Nevertheless, the very next sentence reads as follows:

Note: A door locked with the mechanical key cannot be unlocked using the transmitter.
...which implies there really IS a difference between "the keyed door latch" and "the electrical door latch". Almost as if there are two separate door latching mechanisms that cannot interact. But that contradicts the earlier statement about being able to unlock the door of a dead-battery Evora with its key.

Which is correct? If you're standing next to your locked Evora and its battery is either disconnected or discharged, can you unlock the door with the key - or not?
 

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I always thought the keyhole in the door was for manually unlocking the car. I see no reason to think otherwise.
 

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Nothing to really panic about here. With the battery unplugged, you can still unlock and open the driver's side door. You can also open the hatch with the manual release, although that is a little trickier.

donour
 

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2011 Evora NA 6sp
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Sounds like alot of fake news about people getting locked out their car.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you, folks. I agree it sounds like "fake news" and I would have dismissed it as insane (a key lock doesn't work because of the battery?!?) except that there were multiple discussions about it scattered around on various sites. Several threads on this site, in fact. And reading the manual about how "A door locked with the mechanical key cannot be unlocked using the transmitter" did suggest there could be something weird going on. Thanks for the clarification and reassurances!
 

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And reading the manual about how "A door locked with the mechanical key cannot be unlocked using the transmitter"
I think that intention here is to tell you that the electric actuator that unlocks the door can't turn the key core. It can lock/unlock the latch, but if you manually turn the core, you have to manually turn it back. Weight savings? Nah, cost savings. :)

donour

PS: i've never tried to unlock with transmitter in this position, but the key always works.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Discussion Starter #7
Hmm... that implies that the core remains rotated even after the key is rotated back to "neutral" and removed. That's not how any car door lock I've seen works, but maybe Lotus has something unique.
 

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They are somewhat unique google Elise as well about the position of the key slot and the fob to lock and unlock. Many threads on it so go thru them for some late night entertainment. Not fun being locked out with alarm blaring and battery disconnected....
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Discussion Starter #9
Right, I saw the Elise threads too but didn't know if those experiences related to the Evora's design as well.

That's my whole question: Is it possible to be physically locked out of an Evora with a disconnected/dead battery? I thought this thread had sort of settled on "No" but now your comment makes me wonder afresh.
 

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:oops:

The answer is still, no need to panic. Both driver door and hatch have mechanical releases that operate with no power. Really, the hatch is the bigger deal as that's where the battery is. It's the one everybody worries about. The only annoyance is that the with a low battery you might not be able to de-trigger the alarm, but that's small potatoes next to being locked out.
 

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No. If you can put the key in, you can turn the lock. You then have access to the passenger compartment but not the boot/trunk. There is a pull lever for the trunk but if you have never used it then there's a fair chance it will be seized. To open the trunk electronically you can access the fuse panel in the front foot well and connect a 12 v supply. This will enable the key fob to work.
and open the trunk.
 

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No. If you can put the key in, you can turn the lock. You then have access to the passenger compartment but not the boot/trunk. There is a pull lever for the trunk but if you have never used it then there's a fair chance it will be seized. To open the trunk electronically you can access the fuse panel in the front foot well and connect a 12 v supply. This will enable the key fob to work.
and open the trunk.
This is where the Elise and Evora may differ. I don't know the Evora but you can get fob and mechanical locks out of sync and even though you can turn the lock with the key it will not unlock. You have to leave the key slot in the East West (sideways) position for the fob to work. Many don't use the fob just the key to lock and unlock to avoid potentially getting locked out. Like I said makes for interesting late night reading for engineers.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Discussion Starter #13
You have to leave the key slot in the East West (sideways) position for the fob to work.
Ah... now we're getting somewhere. Is it possible to remove the key in either position? If so, that may explain the confusion between "locking with the key and now the fob cannot unlock it". Perhaps leaving the core in the horizonal position when removing it physically changes the mechanical relationship of some parts. But then you'd think if you were having a problem, you'd still be standing right next to the car and could insert the key to rotate the core to vertical - or just unlock the door using the key, period.

It would be awesome if someone with a 2017+ Evora could test this on an actual car. If someone wants to provide me with an Evora I will be happy to run the tests and provide a complete writeup with photos! {grin}
 
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