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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

found some great articles here about upholstery. I want to do the door panels.
But I’m wondering how it’s done around the door handles - since it’s a rather big and irregular shape.
Any comment would be appreciated!
 

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Hi all,

found some great articles here about upholstery. I want to do the door panels.
But I’m wondering how it’s done around the door handles - since it’s a rather big and irregular shape.
Any comment would be appreciated!
Hi all,

found some great articles here about upholstery. I want to do the door panels.
But I’m wondering how it’s done around the door handles - since it’s a rather big and irregular shape.
Any comment would be appreciated!
Hi all,

found some great articles here about upholstery. I want to do the door panels.
But I’m wondering how it’s done around the door handles - since it’s a rather big and irregular shape.
Any comment would be appreciated!
I have a extra panel and can take better pictures if you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks .. you did it yourself ?
Is it one piece including the part around the door handle hole? Or it’s 2 pieces of fabric?

thank you!
 

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I just re-did mine. stripping the old leather off gives a perfect template for your new material--as long as you use leather again. This is because the door handle piece needs to stretch around the bottom corner. You can use a solution to make the leather more pliable to stretch the corner, which is one of the big plusses to using leather in applications like this. If you are using another material, it would likely be very difficult to do that in one piece, requiring some modification and several pieces sewn together.

You will need to sew in a few places, which will require basic sewing skills and perhaps a walking foot machine depending on the thickness of the material. It's not hard, and can be cheated by simply hemming and carefully glueing instead of stitching the two pieces together. This approach has the advantage of not needing to get the stitch line between the two pieces 100% perfect. You then can stretch the two hemmed pieces together when you glue the material to the base so so that they meet up with the end results looking like they were sewn together in the first place.
 
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