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do you guys warm up your elise, especially during the winter season. my friend i work with says its bad to warm your car up. how many min do you warm your elises up
 

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I warm up 5 - 10 min, then drive below 4k until I see at least 160 deg F.

Every engine has a design temp range. The oil you put in the car is based on this design temp. If your car is above or below this temp it should be driven with caution.
 

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For modern engines the best routine is to start the car and drive off easily. The engine and trans will reach operating temperature faster by doing this - just keep the revs below 4k or so until you've got the water temp up to normal. Sitting still and warming up will actually do more harm - particularly if you sit there and rev the engine like some people do.
 

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idling a car to warm it up harms the engine??? I don't see how. I thought the recommedation to drive the car slowly to warm it up was the result of a gas saving measure. The car gets ZERO mpg while idling so the industry recommends moving along slowly to warm up your car; at least you're getting some mpg that way.

that's what i've heard before anyway....

coming from an MR2T which responded well to being warmed up, I have been warming up my Elise for a few minutes - maybe 3 before driving off slowly until the temp gauge reads 170 or so...
 

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I vaguely remember that my old car's manual (1999 model) said to avoid prolonged stationary warm up as it allowed acidic vapors to build up in the exhaust. Apparently, driving at a modern rpm created enough force to expell all the vapors.

Personally, I'll allow a few minutes (1 or 2) to warm up on a cold day and then driving conservatively until it's at it proper temperature. Incidentally, I tried warming up the Elise for about 5 minutes can never hit the 160 operating temp unti I started driving.
 

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Gentlemen....from extensive personal experience...

...I have a 1988 (16 years old) Honda Civic that I purchased new which has almost 300,000 miles on it. I have never done any engine or transmission work on it at all. In the winter months all I do is start the car up and drive off and keep the idling to a minimum. I do not exceed 3000rpm until it is fully warmed up. Just last month I passed an emission test, and the car does not burn any oil at all. I know, Honda builds the best engines in the world however the Toyota in the Elise should be as good.
I can't remember where I read it but the article said that the newer, fuel injected vehicles (non carb) do not and should not be warmed up by idling them, but instead just driven off asap, which will warm up the engine sooner anyway.
I will do the same once I get my Elise. I will be happy getting 300,000 miles out of the Lotus engine.
Check out the paint, still shines after 16 years-"NuFinish".
Cheers
 

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If memory serves, driving off instead of sitting/idling warms the cats quicker, which is better for emissions (and thus the air we breathe).

Also, engine oil isn't the only thing that needs to warm up. So do our tires, trannies, even our suspension bits... so all things being equal, it's best to get on with it, dig?
 

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JonM3Coupe said:
If memory serves, driving off instead of sitting/idling warms the cats quicker, which is better for emissions (and thus the air we breathe).
That's how I was going to explain the "car's manual (1999 model) said to avoid prolonged stationary warm up as it allowed acidic vapors to build up in the exhaust".
 

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anybody read THIS car's manual? it discusses this point...from the papa lotus point of view
 

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LotusLust said:
anybody read THIS car's manual? it discusses this point...from the papa lotus point of view
Yeah, that would be nice... But, unfortunately, Lotus hasn't yet afforded me that privlidge.
 

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JonM3Coupe said:
Yeah, that would be nice... But, unfortunately, Lotus hasn't yet afforded me that privlidge.
The S1 manual explicitly tells you to drive as soon as you've started the car - idling while the oil is cold is bad for the engine. I haven't got a fed elise but I can't see why it would be any different....

Craigy
 

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Gang,

I was instructed at a club tech event that it was important to start the car and go. The techs stated that there were a number of reasons for this. I recall them mentioning that the water temp increases faster than oil temp, and moving out gets the oil circulating more quickly. The transmission, differential, tires all come up to temperature more quickly while moving. And finally, the catalytic converters warm up better on the move. They made a big deal about the oil temp though. They claimed far too many people would watch the water temp, then rev the motor, but the oil wouldn't be up to temp yet.

Chris
 

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yup - i let it idle for about 10 sec. and then drive of slow and easy, unitl it warms up.

unless it really cold, then you have to have a block heater or let it warm up for quite a while, in mass. i used to wake up - go out and start the car, go inside, take a shower, eat breakfast, get dressed and then (20 mins latter) drive off, and even then - sometimes the little rabbit wouldn't make it up the first hill... i blew the oil temp gauge out - squirting oil all over the place, 20 mins trying to get that thing warmed up and it was still stone cold!
 

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Like 'trip-black" I tend to let the elise warm up for about 5 minutes and I dont rew it up until the temp gets to 165. This is the only car I have ever done this to, but the elise seems to need it.
 

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Two reasons.

1: As hinted above, the transmission is cold. When you start and idle the engine it will warm up, but the engine, joints, great etc will all be ice cold. If you look and see the engine is warm, you will probably drive a bit harder than otherwise, potentially breaking something.

2: Oil pressure. It takes about 15-20 seconds to build pressure, and maybe 10 or so more to get oil to most of the engine. When you start moving the pressure goes up, which is important to get the thick cold oil moving on those nasty mornings.

Nice an easy of course, not hammer down 7krpm until its warm!
 

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One other reason - emissions.

Idling a car is about the worst for emissions (other than possibly wide open throttle). Gently driving gets it above idling and working a bit - less emissions (remember they have to certify the car and instruct owners how to drive the car to comply), but it also helps to get everything gently warmed up.

As others have said, gently - take it easy until a bit after things get warmed up, including the oil (which is harder to judge since we don't have an oil pressure gauge).
 
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