The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just reading through the manual and found this most amusing piece:

WARNING:- When using the rear luggage compartment, beware of any hot surfaces exposed in the engine bay. Before closing the lid, ensure that no persons or objects will be trapped.

I would really love to see a person get trapped in there!!! You can hardly get the boody roof in!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
Re: Re: Re: Warning in the Elise Manual

xxxotic said:
That's what you think agent5
I think I know another agent about 2 numbers higher that would tell you otherwise
I am only agent point 5, so the other guy is actually 6.5 higher. I have a long way to go before getting there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,270 Posts
HoopyFrood said:
:D :D :D

Caution: Happy Fun Car may suddenly accelerate to dangerous speeds.
wasn't that the Audi 4000 quattro ala late 80's?
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
29,083 Posts
babak said:
wasn't that the Audi 4000 quattro ala late 80's?
Not really, it was more driver mistakes and a media frenzy I think, and not understanding the physics that if you put your foot on the brake, and the other foot on the throttle and push both down all the way... the car will not move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Randy Chase said:
Not really, it was more driver mistakes and a media frenzy I think, and not understanding the physics that if you put your foot on the brake, and the other foot on the throttle and push both down all the way... the car will not move.
It was definitely media frenzy! Another point is an engine does not develop power without air. An engine does not get air unless the throttle is open. And they verified that the cruise control was not forcing the thorttle open.

I have driven those cars, but it was a long time age. Since this was a European car, and most of them would have manual transmissions, I bet the brake and gas were much closer together than a typical American car. People are idiots :rolleyes:
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
29,083 Posts
http://walterolson.com/articles/crashtests.html

NO CATALOGUE of this sort would be complete without an account of 60 Minutes's 1986 attack on the Audi 5000--perhaps the best-known and best-refuted auto-safety scare of recent years. The Audi, it seemed, was a car possessed by demons. It would back into garages, dart into swimming pools, plow into bank teller lines, everything but fly on broomsticks, all while its hapless drivers were standing on the brake -- or at least so they said.

"Sudden acceleration" had been alleged in many makes of car other than the Audi, and from the start many automotive observers were inclined to view it skeptically. A working set of brakes, they pointed out, can easily overpower any car's accelerator, even one stuck at full throttle. After accidents of this sort, the brakes were always found to be working fine. Such mishaps happened most often when the car was taking off from rest, and they happened disproportionately to short or elderly drivers who were novices to the Audi.

The Audi's pedals were placed farther to the left, and closer together, than those in many American cars. This may well offer a net safety advantage, by making it easier to switch to the brake in high-speed emergencies. (The Audi had, and has, one of the best safety records on the road.) But it might also allow inattentive drivers to hit the wrong pedal.

60 Minutes was having none of the theory that drivers were hitting the wrong pedal. It found, and interviewed on camera, some experienced drivers who reported the problem. And it showed a filmed demonstration of how an Audi, as fixed up by, yes, an expert witness testifying against the carmaker, could take off from rest at mounting speed. The expert, William Rosenbluth, was quoted as saying that "unusually high transmission pressure" could build up and cause problems. "Again, watch the pedal go down by itself," said Ed Bradley.

Bradley did not, however, tell viewers why that remarkable thing was happening. As Audi lawyers finally managed to establish, Rosenbluth had drilled a hole in the poor car's transmission and attached a hose leading to a tank of compressed air or fluid.

The tank with its attached hose was apparently sitting right on the front passenger seat of the doctored Audi, but the 60 Minutes cameras managed not to pick it up. It might have been for the same reason the Jeep weights were tucked away in the wheel wells, rather than being placed visibly on top. Or why the Dateline rockets were strapped out of sight underneath the truck rather than conspicuously on its side, and were detonated by remote control rather than by a visible wire. Doing it otherwise would only have gotten viewers confused.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,374 Posts
Several cars had similar problems to the Audi.

It wasn't really the pedal size or spacing - it was the location.

The pedals were located more to the left than people were used to them being - the gas pedal was where the brake pedal usually is in most cars. People were putting their foot on what they thought was the brake, but the brake was actually to the left. Of course since their foot was on the gas pedal, the car just moved faster, so they pushed harder.

You can explain this to people, but the one's that experience the "problem" will swear they were pushing on the brake. Of course if they admitted that they could have made a mistake, they would also have to admit to themselves that it was their fault that they ran over the kid, or smashed the car into the house...:rolleyes:

Most manufacturers are now more careful to position the pedals where the (below) average motorist will expect them to be. That's also why we have to have clutch "safety switches" on our starting circuits, and why you have to step on the brake to move the automatic out of park in the US...

Tim Mullen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
Thank god you have to push the clutch it to start todays cars. I almost sent my old truck through the garage wall awhile back!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,344 Posts
I disabled the clutch safety switch on my Jeep. Sometimes the really good torque reduction ability of the starter is useful in crawling situations. It's a little hard on the starter, but it gets ya through some sticky spots.

Cade
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top