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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys, I track pretty hard my 2005 Elise, and for the last 6 months or so... no matter what I do, the brake pedal feels a bit low even after a fresh new flush. We've flushed the brake numerous times but just the feel is off... the grab is there though, but the travel feels weird... initially there is not bite, then a sudden bite. Making it pretty hard to modulate as-well.

Also, occasionally my ABS light flickers, so not sure if these two are related or not?

Any ideas on what it could be, and pointers to check?
 

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You've obviously checked brake fluid levels in the master cylinder right? I've read (and experienced) the ABS/brake light coming on in hard corners occasionally. As for pedal feel, post-flush, you've done the process as best you could right? Made sure *NO* air got in the lines during the flush? Used two people or a brake bleeder tool? Checked brake pads, etc? All the usual suspects have checked out OK right?
 

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How to bleed brakes:

Note many people disagree with my method, so judge for yourself.

Taught to me by semi-famous Toyota engineer, who build championship winning cars and bikes.

1. Get Sears brake bleed kit (canister, hoses, adaptors for bleed valves) and their hand vacuum pump. Kits there have both components. Inexpensive.

2. Pour a little b/f in canister, hook up hoses and use the tightest adaptor you can.

3. Pump vacuum to 20-25” with bleeder valve closed.

4. Tap caliper with small hammer or similar. This releases the air bubbles clinging to the caliper into the stream. WHATEVER method you use, DON’T skip this step.

5. Open bleed valve.

6. When vacuum is almost gone, close bleed valve.

7. Check level in master cylinder. Do this often.

8. Repeat as needed.

Benefits:

*Never got a firmer pedal using any other method.

*Requires only one person. Your wife/so will thank me and you.

*You will not be pushing the piston in m/c into the rough area normally unused in m/c, thereby not prematurely wearing that seal.

Note: On my Elise, I needn’t even remove the wheels.

Yeah, yeah, people use pressure bleeders, but my racecar mechanic friends don’t like these.

Yeah, I know about speed bleeders.

The above is my opinion. No responsibility for screw ups, injuries, maiming or deaths.

Take it, leave it. OK with me.
 

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I've seen this method work very well! I personally use a pressure bleeder but have seen great results your way. Thanks for posting.



How to bleed brakes:

Note many people disagree with my method, so judge for yourself.

Taught to me by semi-famous Toyota engineer, who build championship winning cars and bikes.

1. Get Sears brake bleed kit (canister, hoses, adaptors for bleed valves) and their hand vacuum pump. Kits there have both components. Inexpensive.

2. Pour a little b/f in canister, hook up hoses and use the tightest adaptor you can.

3. Pump vacuum to 20-25” with bleeder valve closed.

4. Tap caliper with small hammer or similar. This releases the air bubbles clinging to the caliper into the stream. WHATEVER method you use, DON’T skip this step.

5. Open bleed valve.

6. When vacuum is almost gone, close bleed valve.

7. Check level in master cylinder. Do this often.

8. Repeat as needed.

Benefits:

*Never got a firmer pedal using any other method.

*Requires only one person. Your wife/so will thank me and you.

*You will not be pushing the piston in m/c into the rough area normally unused in m/c, thereby not prematurely wearing that seal.

Note: On my Elise, I needn’t even remove the wheels.

Yeah, yeah, people use pressure bleeders, but my racecar mechanic friends don’t like these.

Yeah, I know about speed bleeders.

The above is my opinion. No responsibility for screw ups, injuries, maiming or deaths.

Take it, leave it. OK with me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, a few more questions around this:

1- Could this be a issue with air in the ABS system perhaps, maybe that explains why the light sometimes flickers and the spongy feel of the pedal?

2- Also, I noticed the other day, my rear pads are almost gone... but my front pads are almost not used? How could this be that the rears wear significantly more then the fronts?

Any thoughts?
 
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