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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a quick search and noticed there is no real thread about what EFi based systems can do for the user beyond just "tuning" of the engine.

So I'm starting this thread in the hope folks like Kris from DRS and Phil and others will contribute in new ways and/or existing ways on how they are using their EFi based system to do more than just tuning.

I'm intending this thread to be more about Engine protection, Engine monitoring, traction control, fan control, shift control, etc. etc.

So let me start this thread with some questions:

1. Fuel pressure monitoring and how to use thresholds to protect your motor?
2. How to setup no lift up shifts?
3. How to setup auto blip down shifts?

I hope to come up with an comprehensive how to for item #1, but gotta get my motor back together first.

As far as #2 and #3 anyone?

Rob.

P.S. please don't use this thread as a EFi vs. XYZ -- it's not a comparison to other technologies nor is it this is better than that thread. Thank you.
 

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Yes. Actually the no-lift-shift stategy has been around since day one of this particular ECU, and was present in the other more advanced versions of the ECUs for several years before.

The auto-blip of the throttle is something we can also do. We have not done it yet for a Lotus customer, but it's been discussed recently and should not be a problem.

However, I would think either control strategy would be better suited for a car fitted with a sequential gearbox. I can get into more details as to why if you like.

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Excellent, thank you Kris!

Please do get into more details on the auto blip down shifts -- like what hardware is specifically needed.

Rob
 

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Excellent, thank you Kris!

Please do get into more details on the auto blip down shifts -- like what hardware is specifically needed.

Rob

  • Auto-blip downshifts:
  • Typically used with Sequential Gearbox
  • Typical method uses a Strain Gauge Sensor on the gear lever (or micro-switch).
  • Above can also apply to paddle shifters
  • When the voltage is recognized by the ECU it uses this input to activate the calibrated throttle "blip" function
  • The throttle blip calibration is defined by amoutn of throttle change and for time duration in ms before resuming to standard mode
  • No-lift-shift
  • This is also typically used with a Sequential Gearbox
  • This also uses a Strain Gauge Sensor on the gear lever (or micro-switch)
  • Above can also apply to paddle shifters
  • When the voltage is recognized by the ECU it uses this input to activate the engine cut.
  • The No-Lift-Shift calibration is defined by the voltage range of the device and time duration in ms.

Kris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Can these sensors be outfitted to standard manual 6 speed with necessary reliability/consistancy?

I'm no expert on the Matrix tranny, but as I understand it, there is a lever for up and one for down? This is actually a good thing?

What elements are acted on? Throttle (for DBW) or spark or fuel, combination?

Rob
 

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For the standard transmission we have always used a clutch switch input which triggers a non-timed engine cut for shifting. Works very well. Clutch switch needs to trigger just before clutch disengagement. Cut must have minimum rpm to allow bottom gear to be selected & non full throttle driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
dstevens,

Clutch switch in addition to the up/down "strain gauge sensor"? I can't visualize how a clutch switch alone would work for down shift throttle blips?

After reading up on the strain gauge sensor I can visualize how it could measure forward/backward deflection in the shift arm -- and I "think" I can understand why such a sensor would be more suited to sequential motion rather than H pattern.

With that said, couldn't the same Up/Down with the standard tranny be fitted with a switch at the levers on the tranny -- combine this with a clutch switch and I would think one would have a relatively reliable system for no-lift up shifts and auto blip down shifts.

To expand on this, one could simply do a map switch in real time to turn the system off (say for pit entry and/or cool down lap), because my hunch is this setup would be hard to keep "active" for low speed situations and not suitable for street use?

Would there need to be an additional EFi module for this or can the existing expansion harness support these 3 inputs?

Rob.
 

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The No-Lift-Shift does not require an add-on box.

The Auto-Blip downshift will require a DBW controller.

Traction control does require the use of a Multiplexer and chassis loom that we build here. 12 Pos adjustable knob is optional.

Kris
 

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Never tried to use either of these tricks on an H pattern box. The thing that scares me about doing no-lift-shift on an H pattern is the potential error for missing a gear, or a slow shift and exceeding the timer for the engine cut.
Besides, you would need dog gears at a minimum.
 

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I think you're making the H pattern no lift shift more complicated than it needs to be. For upshifting, it is very simple. Cut the engine output while the clutch is down. To shift, you just keep your throttle wide open and operate the clutch and shifter as per normal. It works very smoothly. No timer used, no dog gears needed. For downshifting, blip the throttle manually (well, there's no other way with a manual throttle body).
 

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I think you're making the H pattern no lift shift more complicated than it needs to be. For upshifting, it is very simple. Cut the engine output while the clutch is down. To shift, you just keep your throttle wide open and operate the clutch and shifter as per normal. It works very smoothly. No timer used, no dog gears needed. For downshifting, blip the throttle manually (well, there's no other way with a manual throttle body).
Having never tried it with an H pattern I don't know from personal experience how well it works. Only used these tricks with sequential gearboxes in the past, bikes, or sportscars with bike engines.

kris
 

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Traction control does require the use of a Multiplexer and chassis loom that we build here. 12 Pos adjustable knob is optional.

Kris
Hi Kris, I live in the UK and have a n/a 2006 Exige with dbw+tc.

I'm doing a lot of digging with regards to the TVS kit and have asked questions of Phil with regards to this.

With the EFi ecu how much does the traction control multiplexer and chassis loom cost in addition to the EFi?

Is it something that you are working with Phil on and could possibly incorporate it at the time of a purchase of the TVS kit+EFi.

Does the traction control parameters alter in anyway or is it left at the same bias that is set by Lotus?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I think you're making the H pattern no lift shift more complicated than it needs to be. For upshifting, it is very simple. Cut the engine output while the clutch is down. To shift, you just keep your throttle wide open and operate the clutch and shifter as per normal. It works very smoothly. No timer used, no dog gears needed. For downshifting, blip the throttle manually (well, there's no other way with a manual throttle body).
Be nice to have liftless upshifts, but if you have cut engine output when clutch is down, how do blip throttle manually ? I mean yes you can blip all you want but their will not be any output if you have cut engine output.
 

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Will the EFi ecu work with windows 7?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Will the EFi ecu work with windows 7?
Yes, it'll even work on my MacPro using VMWare Fusion 3 that loads Win 7. As has been said, it's all in the USB to serial cable -- make sure you get the correct one.

Rob.
 

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Brilliant! Thanks guys...I have a 15" macbook pro, but think it's a bit big to cart around in the car so am looking to invest in a 10" Acer netbook with Windows 7, weighs 1.3kg :) But I can get a Windows XP version a little cheaper and won't have compatibility issues.

Have also been looking at usb/serial adaptors, thanks though for the heads up regards compatibility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Brilliant! Thanks guys...I have a 15" macbook pro, but think it's a bit big to cart around in the car so am looking to invest in a 10" Acer netbook with Windows 7, weighs 1.3kg :) But I can get a Windows XP version a little cheaper and won't have compatibility issues.

Have also been looking at usb/serial adaptors, thanks though for the heads up regards compatibility.
Or you can try a Mac Air at 1.3kg also - opt for SSD 128GB drive and 2.16Ghz - 13" display. Not sure how good a 10" display will work when looking at fuel/spark maps along with Lambda monitoring and the like -- Power to Win needs some resolution/real estate or you'll find your self scrolling around the screen a lot which can add to the challenge (especially with Active cursor on). In fact a 13" is kinda small for that purpose -- I use a 15" laptop and find myself wishing for a 17" laptop.

Rob.
 

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Good Call, Rob... I've got a little 10" netbook... It's just O-K... I use it for light duty tuning work. If I'm building a whole map for someone, I use my 13" dell... It has pretty good resolution so I can see what's going on... I think the 15" macbook would work really well. Just need the correct drivers so that when you boot to Windoz, you have the "right click" working. I believe you hit "alt" or "control" and click to get "right click" on the macbooks when running windoz, provided you have the right drivers???? Rob?

In any event, "right click" is really important with the EFI software.

Cheers,

Phil
 
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