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What would you do?

  • Look for a new job ASAP, take the first job with ok pay

    Votes: 13 19.1%
  • Look for a new job ASAP, but wait for a great job

    Votes: 39 57.4%
  • Screw off for a month or two before looking

    Votes: 11 16.2%
  • Wait until severance runs out before looking

    Votes: 3 4.4%
  • Don't look at all, just become a bum

    Votes: 2 2.9%

  • Total voters
    68
  • Poll closed .
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
You've been layed off with 19 weeks of severance pay as well as unemployment money. What to do, what to do? That is the question.
Remember - take a new job and you lose the unemployment which will be ~$1,400.00/month.
 

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First job with ok pay. But keep looking for a better one.


That's what you do with women right?:coolnana:
 

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I would take a month off. But thats just me.. I have been working pretty much everyday for the last 2 years. Only holidays and weekends off.. Can you imagine that? 2 years straight.. No vacations..
 

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I would take a month off. But thats just me.. I have been working pretty much everyday for the last 2 years. Only holidays and weekends off.. Can you imagine that? 2 years straight.. No vacations..
Why?
 

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Get as job as soon as you can.

Nothing like a gap in employment to signal a problem to prospective employers (it's one of the first things I check when looking at someone's resume). Most professional organizations don't take "I took some time off to find myself:shrug:" as a good sign...
 

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Engineering - outlook actually looks promising from jobs posted at indeed.com. Salaries aren't usually listed in the upper ranks, though.
so you're a senior engineer probably with a stable financial condition...

enjoy some time off.. ESPECIALLY if you don't normally take regular vacations. volunteer with habitat for humanity, or some other organization that does good. lounge on the sofa. drink some beer. finish off the honey-do list and maybe get a head start on the springtime stuff... maybe a new flower bed. when track season comes around do a few extra days. enjoy the opportunity that has presented itself.

then get put yer boots back on and go back at the grind.

i've been in your shoes plenty of times... comes with the territory of tech/telecom. i've burned every last penny of the package and i've also been cut only to start a new job the next week. my preference is to split the difference and build up the bank a bit AND recharge the batteries.

there's no right way to do it, and how you plan it may not even play out. i've given up on the whole employment thing, and have a hard time seeing myself ever back on the "inside."

good luck to you.
 

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Look for a great job ASAP, there's no guaranteeing one will be available later, and some of the really good ones take time to find/muck through the hiring process.

In the meantime enjoy your "free time" :D I'd say if you're being selective about what your next gig is, you have at least a month off, even if you're actively looking, whether or not you like it.
 

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Start looking ASAP. It's not likely anything will come along soon.

I was laid off 27 weeks ago... 26 weeks severance. Because of severance pay and unused vacation pay, I'm still not eligble for unemployment until next week.

Having free time is great!

Not having a regular income sucks!

I've been searching for a job. I've had several interviews. I'm trying to stay in the Phoenix metro area, 6th largest in the country, and it's still hard to find a job (I was at the same company for 27 years... maybe age is a factor???).

I had one really good interview for a really cool job in Tucson (~100 miles away). It went very well, but they decided to close the position with out hiring anyone.
 

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Get as job as soon as you can.

Nothing like a gap in employment to signal a problem to prospective employers (it's one of the first things I check when looking at someone's resume). Most professional organizations don't take "I took some time off to find myself:shrug:" as a good sign...
+1 You want to keep the gaps as small as possible. That $1400 a month for the 4 1/2 months your severance is worth will seem small in the future if you have a 4 month gap and don't get a job you really want.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks! All great responses, but, what - no votes to become a bum? I do own a van and there is a river nearby.:D

Seriously though, yeah that severance is going to run out faster than I think and unemployment is good for what it is but not as good as getting a job and getting dbl pay while the severance is there. A month off would be nice, but as noted that's probably going to happen anyway.

Brett is a spring chicken compaired to me so I doubt I'd make the team - I'll send a resume anyway.:p

Saw this today http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tIyt8oSLVs "The Last Lecture." After seeing that it makes this phase in my life trivial.

Keep the responses coming - great to get as many viewpoints as possible.
 

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I'm curious why an employment gap would be considered a negative?

Is there anything wrong with, "When I got laid off my wife and I decided we'd probably never get another chance to go on that year-long world traveling tour we've always talked about, so we did it?"

I mean unless you're in a field where missing a year of new development puts you too out of touch, it shouldn't make any difference, right?

xtn
 

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I'm curious why an employment gap would be considered a negative?
To many employers (right or wrong) getting laid off indicates that you are not one of the best employees (when times get tight, and they have to lay people off, they tend to keep the really good ones if they can). That of course is not necessarily correct (heck I've been laid off when we didn't get an expected contract and I had lowest seniority).

Is there anything wrong with, "When I got laid off my wife and I decided we'd probably never get another chance to go on that year-long world traveling tour we've always talked about, so we did it?"
Again - right or wrong - you might not appear to be serious about working. Yes, you might be able to explain it easily during an interview, but if the prospective employer is sorting through a stack of resumes, the ones that stand out for "problems" tend to get tossed.

I mean unless you're in a field where missing a year of new development puts you too out of touch, it shouldn't make any difference, right?
It can also indicate that you aren't any good, because, not only did you get laid off, but you couldn't find a job. Why should "they" take a risk on you when there are other qualified applicants.

Again, all of this can just be perception, but that's all you got. It doesn't have to be right or worng. You have to present yourself well on your resume to get a job interview. There are many reasons that the guy looking at your resume will toss it and continue looking through the large stack on his desk.

As an example, my wife is an HR director. When an ad is placed in the paper, she can get several hundred resumes for the position (not engineering, but still). She has to sort through them some way - there is not enough time in the year to interview that many people. (Hint: she also tends to toss any with spelling errors).
 

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I totally agree with Tim. I was laid off and the longer I was out of work, the more sparse the interviews became. The only time the calls started to come in was when I decided to relocate back to Los Angeles and told employers I was relocating to my fiancée who lived in LA and our upcoming marriage date (only the fiancée and marriage was true but our plan was to live in Phoenix). I also think there's a bit of a self-esteem loss (and I sincerely speak from experience) of being laid off and the way to shake that off is to get back into the work force in a similar or better position than you had before.

On the other hand, grabbing any engineering job and then leaving shorter thereafter for the next best thing won't look to good on your resume either. It gives the impression of employment instability and lack of commitment. I suppose the same also applies with women. So, when you take your next job, you probably need to stay for about two years.
 

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Agree with Tim. Start looking yesterday and enjoy sleeping in while you search. In a down economy it might take you longer than you think. Besides, if you find a new job right away, you can tell them you'll start in two weeks. Take a nice trip with your leftover severance during those two weeks! :coolnana:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Tim you're scaring the crap out of me! Probably because I know what you say is true. Makes perfect sense and I looked at all those things when looking for a technician. You would be surprised how many applicants miserably failed a simple electronics 101 quiz!

I'm hoping a letter of recommendation from the past VP of Engineering and the prior owner will help.
 
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