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I am a decent shifter. Been doing it for years. But, I get a little kickback in 1 - 3 when I am shifiting. 4 - 6 very smooth. Anyone know @ what RPMs or speeds I should be shifting gears in my 07 Elise?
 

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:shrug:O.K. so your for real..........well here you go! :evil:

Have fun with you new car.



How to Learn To Drive a Stick Shift

Before you begin

Know your way around. A manual transmission demands that the driver shift the gears instead of the engine. Most cars have four or five forward speeds, as well as reverse your Lotus has six. In order to master the process, you need to know the following:

The clutch pedal is located at the far left and is used when moving up or down from one gear to another. The clutch is disengaged when the pedal is pushed to the floor.

Neutral is not a gear; actually, it is the absence of gear. When the engine is running in neutral, you can rev up the engine, but you won't go anywhere. You'll also be able to wiggle the shifter back and forth - which you can't do when engaged in any gear.

For most cars, second gear is the workhorse. It will get you up (and down) steep hills as well as through congested downtown.

Reverse gear is somewhat different from the others: it's got more range than, say, first gear, but doesn't like going for too long or too fast. So, don't back up around the block to pass the time.

The gas pedal (at far right) works with the gears to give the engine power at different levels. As mentioned before, if you press on the gas pedal while out of gear, you will only rev the car up: this is how 50's hot-rodders showed their toughness. But if you over-accelerate with the clutch partially engaged, you'll eventually wear it out.

Step 1: Learn the Gears

Learn the location of and feel of passing through the gears. First learn to shift the gears without the car running (pushing the clutch in each time). Then, from the passenger seat, try it with someone else driving the car and operating the clutch. Be sure to place the stick all the way into gear--until it won't go any more--but don't force it. If you stop halfway, you will hear an incredibly unpleasant grinding sound which means your car is not in gear.

Eventually, you will know when to shift by feel, but early on you'll have to act deliberately. Even if you've never been in a car before, you can tell when a car is in the appropriate gear: the car's not making a coughing and chugging sound (gear too high) but it's not making a high-revving sound either (gear too low). If you have a tachometer, shift around "3" (3000 rpm) on each gear or every 15 miles per hour (1st gear 1-15, 2nd 15-30, 3rd 30-45, etc.). This is only a general rule, of course, and higher powered autos (like your Lotus) will deviate from this. Shift before you hear that loud revving sound.


Step 2: Start it up

Put the car in neutral before starting, or you will jump ahead. Keep in mind that most new cars will not start without the clutch pressed down. Leave the shifter into neutral while the car warms up. Alternately, start the car in gear with the clutch pedal pushed to the floor, then shift into neutral, release the clutch pedal, and let the car warm up.


Step 3: Protect the clutch, yourself and the car

The clutch is the mechanism that allows the gears to transition back and forth smoothly. If you pull the car in or out of gear without using the clutch, or release the clutch only halfway into gear, you will hear an amazingly unpleasant sound. Avoid this.

It's difficult to avoid some sort of wear and tear on the clutch when learning how to drive a stick shift. If you go slowly at first and pay close attention, you can feel (in your feet) where the clutch engages and disengages. If you learn that well, you'll put less strain on your car. You'll also be able to drive any stick shift more smoothly from the get-go.

Avoid needless acceleration when the clutch is partially engaged. When at a stoplight, don't get in the habit of holding the clutch in for more than a few seconds or you will have other problems down the line. Instead, put the car in neutral while stopped for any period of time.

Popping the clutch: Invariably, you will miss your gear (or release the clutch too quickly) and the car will lurch ahead. Often at the outset, you will pop the clutch too quickly and stall the car. Don't worry, it happens to everyone. Just get those exercises out of the way before you find yourself in bumper-to-bumper traffic. .


Step 4: Find the G spot

Here we are at the most important junction of the stick shift world: the door to acceleration. Driving a stick shift is all about that magical place where the clutch comes up and the gas pedal goes down. It's that seamless place where the gears are shifted and the car accelerates. Let's take first to second on a flat road as an example: First gear going steady, clutch in as you come off the gas quickly, then off the clutch slowly while pressing in the gas.

That place in the middle where the clutch pedal is to the floor and you're off the gas is where you take the shifter from first to second. Get those feet and hands used to working together.

Here we go once more:

* Revving high (around 3000 rpms or at 15 mph).
* Clutch in and gas off.
* Move the shifter smoothly from first to second.
* Slowly off the clutch while pushing on the gas.
* Completely let your foot off the clutch and gas it up.
* Same time next gear!



Step 5: Now try downshifting

Downshifting is the act of moving appropriately to lower gears while slowing down. This is the essential difference between the operation of an automatic transmission and one of manual persuasion: downshifting not only helps you slow the car, but it also puts you in the right gear for the speed. Downshifting is your friend - especially in bad weather or on hills, where immediate braking can be dangerous.

Keep in mind that you may shift down only one gear or simply apply the brakes. Again, knowing your range in each gear will help determine what's needed.

While downshifting, move from clutch to brake while in gear. This will help you slow down without revving too high between gears.

If you are driving 45 mph in fourth gear and come upon a stop sign ahead:

* Push in the clutch and shift down to third while using the brake.
* Let the clutch out slowly to avoid high revs.
* Next, do it again into second before you stop.
* Don't downshift into first!



Step 6: Learn the subtleties of reverse

Be very careful in backing up. The reverse gear is very quick and can jump out at you. To get into reverse, sometimes you need to run the shifter through the other gears first with the clutch in.

The clutch is key while going in reverse. Since reverse is so quick, let out the clutch slowly and push it back in while using the brake if necessary; you will likely be able to back out of any spot with this simple measure.


Step 7: Win the hill challenge

Find a hill with little traffic. Use your emergency brake when coming to a stop. When the light turns green to go, shift into first, start to accelerate slowly as you release the clutch pedal, then release the emergency brake just as you feel the car engage the gear. This way you are using the brake to keep you from rolling back. If you stall, put on your brake and start again.


Step 8: Remember the parking brake

It is important to note that the emergency brake is very important when parking a stick shift car, because there exists no "park" gear to keep the car from rolling. Some rely only on the pull-up emergency brake, usually sufficient in most situations. But for extra safety, leave the car in gear AND use the emergency brake.


Step 9: Practice these scenarios

In the neighborhood, 25 mph: Start, 1st gear, change to second gear, run either high rpm in second gear or low rpm in third. Sometimes run high to low second gear depending on speed.

On the highway: High rpm in third or fourth onto the highway at the appropriate speed, then fifth gear and to go fast try the sixth (if available).

Going down a steep hill: Keep the car in a gear that will aid the braking process, the engine sounds like it's working but not screeching. You may press the clutch in and out to further complement your braking.

Have fun :nanner2:
 

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1-3, 4-6? are you sure you're in the right car? I know, it's a cute car.

Seriously, right before redline when the shift light comes on works for me.
 

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I found this chart someone else posted in another thread rather helpful...

 

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Been doing it for years.
really??

then it might be the way you've taught yourself to shift. I know a guy that cant shift smoothly at all (in any car), and no matter how much we try he still bogs the car. Its just the way he learned how to shift and he cant change it now..weird i know :panic:.
 

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My Rx is:

PRN (as needed)

At a stop, clutch pedal down, engage first gear. Let out the clutch while rapidly putting the skinny pedal to the floor. When the little red shift light comes on, momentarily engage clutch, lift foot from skinny pedal and shift. When the next higher gear is selected, re-engage clutch and put skinny pedal back to the floor. repeat until proper grin achieved, or after six repetitions in one dosage.

Dr. Lotus

P.S. the NA lotus is a very peaky car, it will take some getting used to the step in power at 5-6kish rpm. Try keeping it higher in the RPM range.
 

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I get a little kickback in 1 - 3 when I am shifiting.
Your not getting "kickback" in 4-6 because they are easy shifts. 1-3 are harder to shift smoothly and it will take patience and practice.

The "kickback" you feel is due to you not balancing the clutch and accelerator correctly.

I cant explain to you how to do this except tell you that its like riding a bicycle. Meaning both your feet should work together and come up/down together at the same time. Sorry for confusing you even more..lol
 

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I am a decent shifter. Been doing it for years. But, I get a little kickback in 1 - 3 when I am shifiting. 4 - 6 very smooth. Anyone know @ what RPMs or speeds I should be shifting gears in my 07 Elise?
In order to get an answer that may actually help you, you are going to need to explain what you mean better than saying "I get a little kickback." Do you mean that the shifter is trying to jump out of position? Is the shifter pushing back towards neutral "when I am shifting"? Is the car buck-jumping? Are you feeling thumping in the clutch pedal? Is your wife kicking your leg because you're accelerating too quickly? More detail would be helpful.
 

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all i can think is: Don't buy a used car.
 

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"when I am shifting"? Is the car buck-jumping? Are you feeling thumping in the clutch pedal? Is your wife kicking your leg because you're accelerating too quickly? More detail would be helpful.
RD, i think what he means is that when he shifts from 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 the car bogs/buck-jumps/kickbacks....and when he shifts from 3 to 4 and 4 to 5 its smooth.
 

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...i'm often not as smooth as i'd prefer when downshifting into second or first, but those can be tricky gears to rev-match on the street...lately i've also been occasionally missing second under hard acceleration, but i attribute that more to transmission wear than anything else...

...yes, the LETSLA kit is next in my upgrade queue...
 

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Funny, I prefer the Elise clutch to the X-type any day! Talk about a "kick back" - the Jag will not let you let the clutch out "fast" in the early gears...I feel bad for passengers when I am trying to get off to a "quick" start.

Lotus > Jaguar clutch
 

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Funny, I prefer the Elise clutch to the X-type any day! Talk about a "kick back" - the Jag will not let you let the clutch out "fast" in the early gears...I feel bad for passengers when I am trying to get off to a "quick" start.

Lotus > Jaguar clutch
Buddy of mine had an '03 or '04 and it was exactly like that. I never drove it to see if it was just his shifting though.
 

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The flywheel is way to heavy in that car(x-type). I had one when they first came out. You can shift them smooth with practice.
 

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I don't understand asking what RPM to shift at. you can shift at any RPM you want (with exceptions obviously, like downshifting), it just takes time and practice to get smooth in all situations.
 

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Buddy of mine had an '03 or '04 and it was exactly like that. I never drove it to see if it was just his shifting though.
It took a little time to get used to...at first I thought it was me...so, I decided to ask a question about the clutch on an X-type message board...you could imagine the responses I got back...:rolleyes:
 

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The flywheel is way to heavy in that car(x-type). I had one when they first came out. You can shift them smooth with practice.
True - just a very different release point than most clutches. The crazy thing now is that ever since I started driving the Elise I am much more aggressive with the X-type...where I was shifting at about 3500 before, it's more into the 4500's and up...no matter what, though it feels like I am driving a bus now...

Manual trans, all wheel drive and all that weight, with fresh tires the thing is a bull in the snow!
 

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Wow this is a tough crowd to ask that type of question. But let me be the serious one to try to answer your question, I also was was having a hard time with a slight buck when shifting in the lower gears, mostly when I was trying to just cruise around town and not be an a$$ showing everyone around how high this engine can rev.
For the record I can properly heel and toe down sift all the way to 1st with no bucking/no strain on the synchros so I have learned how to drive manuals. I practiced quite a bit trying to smooth out the shifts, I tried different shift points, real high in the revs/low in the revs and found only one thing that will smooth out the shifting both up and down. You have to shift quite fast, in other words do the shifting procedure as fast as you can. Push on the clutch while moving the gear shift, you can time it just right so that as your clutch dis-engages your already pushing the shifter into the next gear (not so fast that your waiting for the clutch with the shifter but just at the right time. Then releasing the clutch quicky and back on the gas at the same time. I found that cars like ours have a lighter fly wheel than most other cars which means the revs are going to drop off much faster so you have to shift quicker to avoid that little buck when you re-engage the clutch with a slower rotating flywheel. Your going to feel an increased bucking/hesitation when the airconditioner is on because that pump that runs AC is very demanding on the engine and will slow the flywheel very quickly, so its really important that you shift quickly to avoid that bucking.
So I guess what I would try is simply shifting like your on a race track or in a drag race, you don't have to redline the engine, pin the gas to the floor, or anything crazy, just shift like you are. The harder and faster I shift the smoother it becomes, this car likes to be drivin hard, more than it like to cruise around, so drive it hard, not fast unless you want to smile then pin the gas and smile.
I hope this helps just a little.
 

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Another thing that is important, push the clutch through its full travel for each gear. You may not be fully engaging the clutch before attempting to shift.
 
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