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Discussion Starter #1
After washing my 06 supercharged Elise light colored smoke (probably white, but it could be blueish) came out of the exhaust and it started idling erratically. It threw lots of codes such as:

P1302: Unknown code
P0202: Injector Circuit - Cylinder 2
P0302: Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected
P2647: A Rocker Arm Actuator System Stuck

After running for a few days it will sputter occasionally and then eventually start running fine again. I know it contradicts the color, but the smell coming from the exhaust is a strong fuel smell. I don't know if it's related, but ever since I bought the car I've smelled a gas scent when the windows are down.

Since this is the third time this has happened after a carwash, I'm convinced that it has something to do with the water. Even after a rain, the car has a hard time starting. After the last carwash I cleaned the airfilter and changed the oil, which didn't seem to do much.

So the plan is to be more careful when washing the car from now on, but I'm afraid that a heavy rain or something could cause it to happen again. I'd really like to know what's going on. Has anyone else experienced this?
 

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I can tell you that I just did a track day in the rain, and no issues. Car is de-snorkled with K&N filter and was at wide open throttle quite a bit. I'm thinking rain at 100mph should at least be equivalent to a car wash!
Have you taken off the diffuser and rear panel to look for signs of a fuel leak, possibly with the filler hose or tank?
Good luck and keep us posted.


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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German Reimport
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Check your coil packs.
If they are not sealed water can get down the spark plug tube.
What he said :up:
And running a car in the rain is completely different than hosing it down while washing with respects to the amount of water that will get into the engine bay.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i tried three different things, so here's an update. if anyone else starts having similar symptoms maybe they'll read this and find something useful.

a couple of the spark plugs were dirty so i replaced them. but i don't think that was the source of the problem (probably more of a symptom).

sent the plugs into the manufacturer and they said they were all within specs and then they cleaned them.

i also put dielectric grease on the coil pack shafts, which i suspect is probably what really fixed it. there are some threads here in the forums where a lot of guys had similar troubles and found that spark was bridging through the insulator.

so far i've washed the car twice and driven it about 500 miles - no codes, smoke, or sputtering. crossing my fingers... :)
 

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If you don't have the stock air box with the snorkel, a car wash may get the air filter wet. A wet air filter can also cause a lot of problems. My experience includes sputtering, a little white smoke, rev limit at about 4500 RPM, and throwing codes. Once the filter dries, all is fine (the codes eventually clear).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My air filter does get wet in the rain - it's one of those cone shaped ones that feeds into the supercharger. I the future, I will be careful to cover that when parked in the rain or at a carwash.

However, the air filter is definitely not the problem. I've been having the same problem again over the past few months (it rarely rains in NM).

Using a spray bottle containing water, I sprayed each coil and nothing happened. Then I sprayed each injector and it seems that whenever I spray #1 or #2 (especially #1), liquid comes out the tailpipe (it smells like gas, but it could contain water too). If I spray enough water, it'll start sputtering, smoking, throwing codes etc. This is very repeatable.

I replaced all four rubber o-rings between the injectors and engine and all four rubber o-rings between the injector and fuel rail. This did not solve the problem. There doesn't seem to be much else there that could let water in.

The only things nearby are:

1) The gasket between the upper-intake manifold and the supercharger hose that goes to the intercooler.
2) The VVC solenoid.
3) Maybe it's dripping down the engine to somewhere lower that's not visible?
4) The injectors.

I guess the next plan is to replace the upper-intake-to-intercooler gasket and see what that does. It's hard to see in there even with a flashlight, but it looks OK visually.

I'll check back and update this thread later.
 

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sounds like the water is shorting out the injectors, causing them to stay open and inject continuously, hence the extra fuel and smoke. try applying dielectric grease to the injector plugs and contacts, then repeat the squirt bottle exercise and see if it still happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
solution found!!

In case anyone else has this problem, I finally figured it out!

The clue that tipped me off was that not too long later the engine started "whistling". Literally - there was a medium pitched whistling whenever the engine was running.

It turned out that it was the gasket/seal between the intake manifold and the engine. The vision function supercharger kit replaces the original intake manifold with their own - which is a large black metal pipe that goes to the intercooler. The original intake manifold (page 5) has been replaced by the new one (page 22 and 23) of the supercharger install instructions: http://tachyon.zapto.org/foo/elise/Lotus Elise SC Kit Install Ver2.pdf

I was able to remove the intake manifold without removing the supercharger. If I had to do it over again, I would remove the serpentine belt to make it easier to get the bolts back in (that sucked!). I then ordered a new gasket through the Toyota dealership and put it on with a small amount of black RTV and tightened up the bolts as much as possible.

Here is a picture of the gasket that was leaking:



Now I can finally wash the car and leave it out in the rain! And most importantly, my friends are no longer asking why my car sounds like a teapot!!

--luke
 

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I was able to remove the intake manifold without removing the supercharger. If I had to do it over again, I would remove the serpentine belt to make it easier to get the bolts back in (that sucked!).
Especially if you knew it only adds about 10-15 minutes of work to take off and put on the belt rotfl
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The serpentine belt is actually much harder in my case... A previous owner had stripped the tensioner bolt head so I can't use a breaker bar. Last time I pulled the belt off and put it back on with my bare hands. It's possible to do it that way but it requires a lot of strength and really hurts your fingers!
 

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Well getting that tensioner off the engine does require a fair bit of work. The bolt that holds it to the block is OBNOXIOUSLY long and requires the engine to be lifted several inches in order to clear the chassis.
 
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