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Discussion Starter #1
I can't believe Lotus didn't fit LSDs to all of the esprits from day one. Come on now, an LSD is essential on any high performance car.

Every 80's 3XX ferrari had an LSD. Almost all 80's 911's hs LSD's. Did Lotus think owner's just wouldn't notice? My '88 spins it's inside tire on almost any tight turn with just a little power on (no, it's not the tires).

I see there's a quaife LSD available for the Citroen SM trasaxle in my '88....which I'm tempted to buy. Anyone here ever installed a quaife in the citroen SM transaxle? Thanks.
 

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How much for one for 1994 S4?
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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I HATED the LSD on my Mustang...so I didn't feel the need to buy one for the Lotus when I rebuilt the transaxle.

The Quaife IS supposed to make the Citroen 'box more reliable tho'


Eddie B (Sleek GT) is installing one in his '88 now.


++++++++++


Midlife, you should ping LotusS4s, Sanj, or VulcanGrey about installing the Quaife in the Renault transaxle...
 

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I got my quaife LSD for my 95 S4 from GTO Racing, I installed it while I was upgrading my tranny. They got several option for the tranny which you might want to consider. I got the updated 5 speed close ratio. I love the sound it produces in 1st gear.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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MRDANGERUS has one in his 88; I believe it's cryo treated (or at least the CWP for sure).

In contrast to Atwell (carbuff), I also came from the Mustang GT world (19 years) and both my 92 and 06 GT had Traction-Lok (torque-sensing diff) and I liked them alot. When I started getting tire spinning the 88 Esprit in the rain (with worn, but legal tires), didn't realize how used I got to LSD (oops - the NSA may think I'm an addict...).

So I got my Quaife from Harry (dsvitesse1). I'm old school - Harry was very helpful in answering my naive Quaife questions (along with many others here). I returned the favor by buying from him.

Check out my Quaife parts here (I'm suppose to get the car back this week):

http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f164/citroen-circlip-pre-emptive-strike-200137/index6.html#post2851306

Beerman - As an 88 owner, you may want to see the whole thread regard my early replacement of the Citroen circlip:

http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f164/citroen-circlip-pre-emptive-strike-200137/
 

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I put the Quaife in my 89SE with the Renault transmission.

For the 88 and earlier Citroen, you should speak with Harry Martens above, since he is the man for a new Quaife LSD for the Citroen cars. He actually paid for Quaife to do the tooling for that differential for the Citroen transmission.

I really like the Quaife in my SE! It has greatly increased the rear traction, without adding understeer. With it you can easily pivot the car tighter into a corner than you could before. You just have to be more careful in the rain and snow, since both tires are more likely to break free at the same time with the LSD.
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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When I started getting tire spinning the 88 Esprit in the rain (with worn, but legal tires), didn't realize how used I got to LSD (oops - the NSA may think I'm an addict...).
My issue with the Mustang LSD was, rather than one wheel spinning, BOTH would (in the rain, or cold). This resulted in the rear end of the car losing grip, and me spinning out! -eek- :crazyeyes :no:



Luckily, never damaged the car from those incidents, but I felt it made the car unpredictable in low traction conditions.

Also, I'll point out, it was a "traditional" Detroit locking diff, not a Quaife (which is a Torque-Biasing diffy and is superior to that used in the Fox-body Mustang I owned).

Differentials - Quaife Engineering


:bow: To Harry for fronting the development costs for the Esprit!
 

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Unless you track the car you should never get near the limits of the OEM dif. For what you will spend to put the LSD Quaife in, it is not worth it for most drivers. It adds little, if any, value to the car when you sell it. If you want it for bragging rights, then go for it. Figure you will also be replacing the clutch and possibly the syncros and carrier bearings too. Your money would be better spent on a high performance driving course.
David Teitelbaum
 

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My issue with the Mustang LSD was, rather than one wheel spinning, BOTH would (in the rain, or cold). This resulted in the rear end of the car losing grip, and me spinning out! -eek- :crazyeyes :no:
[snip]
Ah, but I LOVE the spin RECOVERY - lots of fun! Of course, in California, the rain is not nearly as heavy as other places.

I agree with David - the Quaife is overkill for a non-track car like mine.
However, in certain rain-traction situations, I believe I can make some use of it.

And I drank the Kool-aid regarding the potential durability that a Quaife adds to a C35 (however minute/practical that may be).

But think about it - for a daily driver, an Esprit is WAY overkill too rotfl
 

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[snp]
Also, I'll point out, it was a "traditional" Detroit locking diff, not a Quaife (which is a Torque-Biasing diffy and is superior to that used in the Fox-body Mustang I owned).[snip]
Hmmm.. I used the terminology incorrectly.

Wikipedia describes the difference between an LSD, Traction-Lok (Ford's marketing term for 'torque sensing' differential), and Quaife (also torque-sensing).

My Fox body Mustang GT (92) had an OEM 'Traction-Lok' similar to a Quaife.

Not sure why Atwell's Mustang had a (aftermarket?) 'Detroit' locking diff - that is more severe and meant for racing only (not practical for street due to abruptness and noise).

So - my Esprit with the Quaife should behave like my 92/06 Mustang GT Traction-Lok diffs.



The Quaife, new carrier bearings and diff bolts, shim kit, throw out bearing rubber o-rings, drive shaft housing gaskets.
 

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Agree with David that it is really something to consider only if you have to repair the transaxle / clutch anyway. Plan is to track my car occasionally this summer; just joined a group that books some time locally.

Installed the Quaife in my 2000 V8. Had it done by a specialist in conjunction with the other work (clutch, 2nd gear synchro, GTO upgrade kit).

Performance improvement is definitely noticeable. I did not have a lot of experience with my new car prior to the repairs and mods; no track time, but had got the car a bit loose twice with power application on the street. With the Quaife the car pulls out of corners on the track in a very sure footed manner, and I find it easily correctable if it gets a bit loose.

My specialist (who granted, sold me the Quaife ;)) said it is the best single upgrade for the V8. I think he added one to his V8.

So, really happy with the mod, but a big part of the 'improvement' could be getting used to the car and taking a day of track instruction :).


Stu
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Unless you track the car you should never get near the limits of the OEM dif. For what you will spend to put the LSD Quaife in, it is not worth it for most drivers. It adds little, if any, value to the car when you sell it. If you want it for bragging rights, then go for it. Figure you will also be replacing the clutch and possibly the syncros and carrier bearings too. Your money would be better spent on a high performance driving course.
David Teitelbaum
Are you kidding me? Please. The turbo esprit puts out enough power that an LSD is very, very helpful (and much safer) for street driving.

I know I'd pay more for an esprit with an LSD installed. Yeah, it does add value.

No need to replace anything else to install the LSD.

I don't need a high performance driving school. I used volunteer my time teaching at club track days. I need a car that doesn't spin its inside tire uncontrollably in the wet.

The LSD improves the strength and durability of the transaxle with an open diff. A lot. Why? Because the spider gears in the open diff are one of the weak links.
 

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"The turbo esprit puts out enough power that an LSD is very, very helpful (and much safer) for street driving."

I used to fishtail.....not anymore since quaife!
 

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My inside rear wheel lights up on lower speed tight turns. ..... one wheel peel...... single tire fryer.......etc. Sad that Lotus didn't put a limited slip diff in these cars.
 

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Cal H
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There is also a danger in spinning a tire then hooking up as the transmission will be put at risk. There was guy with a V8 recently with tranny problems after u turn. He probably spun one wheel then hooked up the LSD does help in those situations
 

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Unless you track the car you should never get near the limits of the OEM dif. For what you will spend to put the LSD Quaife in, it is not worth it for most drivers. It adds little, if any, value to the car when you sell it. If you want it for bragging rights, then go for it. Figure you will also be replacing the clutch and possibly the syncros and carrier bearings too. Your money would be better spent on a high performance driving course.
David Teitelbaum
I'm with David on this one.

Never missed not having one on my car and I have driven it pretty hard over the last 14 years.

Of course mashing ones foot down coming out of a tight corner will provoke the inside wheel to spin (especially in the wet), I just apply the throttle in a controlled manner to avoid it.

Of course If I were road racing or autocrossing the Esprit where every fraction of a second counts, I would fit one, but of course then I would also have to change or modify pretty much everything on the car.:D
 

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On my SE with stiffer suspension, Spax with stock springs, and with the stock SE size tires, I would say the inside tire spin was chronic on track, and mildly annoying on the street. The car always cornered really flat, but on tight turns, the lack of a rear sway bar and the semi trailing rear suspension will allow that inside tire to lift. Clearly seen here.


Later I added the V8 wheels and tires, still chronic on track, and less annoying on the street.

On some corners you had to be so judicious with the throttle, that you were practically coasting, and then bang turbo as you started to accelerate from the apex.

Then I added the Quaife LSD, and now you can be on the power soooo much sooner, and use the throttle to tighten the line.

Now I have JRZ double adjustable shocks with stiffer Eibach springs, so I can really tune out the rear tire lift, but there is no way I would go back to the open diff and give up all that traction.

I can see why a Quaife may not be worth it for everyone, especially with the cost and labor, but why would anyone say "I'm ok with half traction". ;)

I would not go back!

I also put a Torsen in my Acura btw.
 

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I was talking to Roger Becker years ago, and I asked him why Lotus didn't fit an LSD into the Turbo Esprit.

Pretty sure he replied they found it increased low speed oversteer in certain situations and affected the handling balance, making the car understeer more at the limit, (or could have been the reverse)so the car was deemed better all round by them when fitted with an open differential.

Running suspension with stiff springs on a road car as you know is not the Lotus method of obtaining great handling, softer springs with well matched controlled damping is.

Track driving is another matter, stiff springs and sticky gummy tyres are pretty much the way to go for most drivers(on a smooth track surface), but on a road car who wants tyres that last a week and a teeth chattering ,bone jarring ride on bumpy roads?

Not Me.:(
 
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