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Discussion Starter #1
I am curious about the relative safety standpoints in replacing the front windscreen/windshield with a Poly or Plexiglass/Perspex. I know anything other than glass will scratch. Racecars use non glass and do have to meet safety issues. It is too late to change mine this time around as my replacement wndshield is already on order, but the next time I can see there is a considerable weight gain here. Also the Perspex replacement is much easier to swap oput than the stock glass and is cheaper too!
So are there safety aspects to consider if Perspex or Polycarboante are used ?
I am hoping someone here may know the answer to this question.

I asked this in the racing list but I am hoping for a wider audience here ? :(
 

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I don't really know, but the ones offered are for Race Track Only, so it's safe to assume that it wont meet Federal standards.
 

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Most states (all?) will allow only glass windshields. Really, anything else will scratch easily - just using your wipers may make the windshield unusable (anyone who wears plastic glasses knows how careful you have to be cleaning them without scratching the lens). Additionally, depending on the type of plastic, a non-glass windshield may shatter into sharp, dangerous shards instead of remaining relatively intact like a normal "safety glass" windshield. The trade-offs may be acceptable for short time use on a race car (replaced often), but otherwise, you really want glass...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
As we really do not have that much rain, scratching wouldn't be a problem. Passing inspection would though.
I'll have to find out if this is the case here. Thanks Guys.
 

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The vast majority of all, if not all, automotive glass is laminated "Safety Glass", a mix of glass and polycarbonite.

Link Here

It's glass on the outside and inside to protect from scratches, plastic in the middle to keep the window from shattering. Some have multiple layers of both.

It's the reason that when a rock hits your windshield that it makes a little dent with cracks instead of smashing the entire thing. The glass outerlayer is smashed but the softer plastic can absorb the impact better. As long as the plastic isn't too severly damaged then you'll end up with a little crater. If it is damaged you might end up with a crack that slowly expands due to the window expanding and contracting with heat.
 
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