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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to get some more specific ideas of what some fellow CNDians do to store their Lotus's for the long cold winter ahead.
 

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Hi, are you a new owner?

I am keeping mine in an indoor heated garage. I'm doing the following:
- inflating tires to 35 psi
- removing battery
- locking doors with key (so they cannot be opened from the inside)
- no parking brake, transmission in gear
- will change oil and trans fluid in spring
- fill fuel tank and add Stabil

Was contemplating car cover, but going without. If someone wants to vandalize it, they will even with the cover on!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sounds good to me. I went to the liberty this year to put a couple of boxes of baking soda in the boot and cabin to absorb some moisture. A little trick from a fellow petrol head. Also was advised to look into getting a CAR COON for next year. I got the car cover on her also....but will be taking peaks once in a while just to keep me motivated for the next spring.
Ciao
 

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I drive my Elise through the winter. Toronto weather is not too bad and I have Yokohama Ice Guard tires.

My Porsche friend does four things:
- Inflates the tires much higher than normal
- Adds a trickle charger for the battery
- Adds stabilizer to the gas tank
- Stores it in a non-heated garage

According to him his Porsche starts up nicely in the spring.
 

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I too store the car over the winter, and pretty much follow the same regimen as David's Porsche owning friend. I've used the same regimen for many many years on my Elan as well and I've never had a problem in the spring

- Wash and wax the car, and make sure it's good and dry before putting it away
- Change oil now. The acids in the dirty oil can damage the bearings over the winter, and besides having clean oil in the spring just means you can get out there sooner.
- Overinflate the tires. I go 10psi above "max pressure" on the sidewall. DO NOT jack the car up and leave the suspension drooping. Some people say put the suspension on blocks to alleviate the stress on the wheel bearings, but I don't subscribe to that theory.
- Put the battery on a trickle charger. Some people disconnect the battery from the rest of the car to eliminate the risk of a rodent's chewing causing a short and subsequent fire. I'm not consistent on that front.
- Fill the tank (to cut down on evaporation within the tank) and add fuel stabilizer.
- No parking brake. I chock the wheels.
- Store it in a garage. I use a cover to keep the dust down. Cool is better than warm, but IMHO, all things considered, warm is better than outside.

Last year I put a couple of boxes of silica gel in both my cars, since the Elan was showing signs of minor dried condensation / mold on the dash (not sure which). It didn't seem to make much difference and in the spring both boxes were maxxed out with respect to moisture absorbance. I, unfortunately, keep the cars in a garage that is shared with a car that *does* go out in the winter which is not ideal, but I'm not keen on paying for car storage when I have a 3 car garage at home. I'm thinking about a dehumidifer, but haven't gone much further than thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great tips all around...oils are done for sure and the Acu sump system is charged fully to unload before first start up. I got a nice set of tired pads to keep the tires off the ground and to avoid flat spots. Tire psi is up to 40 all around.


Question: To remove (and store the battery indoors warm and trickled/maintain charged)
or to NOT REMOVE but just pull the batter trigger (race battery) (non heated garage) and put a batter trickle/maintainer on there.
Obviously no Alarm engaged.
 

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My manual states 60psi for the tires in storage...
 
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