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What is the recommended procedure for winter storage...full or empty? Normally I would store it with a full tank, but I expect to put only ~1.5K miles/yr, so a full tank could last a little while into next spring. In either case, is there an approved fuel additive that I can/should get from my local parts store?

Also, I typically replace oil first thing in the spring on my other stored car. Is it better to change the oil before putting it away in the fall, or first thing in the spring?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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I have always been told to store the car with a full tank of fuel. The thinking is that in the cold the water vapor in the air will condense adding water into the fuel. With a full tank you have way less air to cause problems. Would it hurt not having a full tank, probably not but what's the worst that could happen having it full?

Also, just get some fuel stabilizer. I just bought some today and it says it keeps fuel good for 12 months.

As for oil, I don't know. I have heard lots of theories from others, bit I don't know if there is a rule on when to change your oil.
 

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Thanks. We have the exact same car. Where in WI are you? I lived in Madison until late 06...now I'm in Minneapolis.
Mike
 

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I'm in Oak Creek (near Milwaukee). This next summer you should watch the midwest region threads for drives. We have a big Chicago / Milwaukee crew who are quite active.
 

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Less is Better
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What is the recommended procedure for winter storage...full or empty? Normally I would store it with a full tank, but I expect to put only ~1.5K miles/yr, so a full tank could last a little while into next spring. In either case, is there an approved fuel additive that I can/should get from my local parts store?

Also, I typically replace oil first thing in the spring on my other stored car. Is it better to change the oil before putting it away in the fall, or first thing in the spring?

Thanks,
Mike
General rule of thumb, store the car with a full tank, the fuel displaces moist air and minimizes condensation, as stated earlier. Sta-bil is readily available. Likewise, it's best to store the car with fresh oil. Used oils have moisture and acids that can corrode engine internals over time.

Also, make sure to keep a maintainer on the battery. NOT a trickle charger, but a maintainer that stops charging when the battery is fully charged.
 

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Mike,
There are threads on LT covering this, but a full tank and oil change are good ideas for the reasons noted above.
I used to use Sta Bil, but have been using Seafoam for the past several years in anything with combustion. I have had no problems with it whatsoever and have many stories of how that stuff has brought small engines back to life and smoothed out rough running car engines. It's pretty amazing, actually (I'm not a Seafoam rep nor do I own their stock. Lol ).


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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Full tank with STA-BIL in the tank, run car for 10min to work in entire system. Fill your tires up to near 40lbs to reduce flat spots (never had a problem here with that) and either pull the battery, the neg off or put a maintainer on it over the season. Oil change AFTER the season if your on mineral oil, synthetic doesn't break down (the additives not the oil) like mineral oils' do. Cold weather kills the additives in mineral oils. Never store any in a cold garage over the winter. Again this doesn't affect synthetics.
 

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No need to limit the tire pressure to 40. Check the sidewall for the max rated pressure. IIRC, the Yokos are good to 50. Whatever it is, the number is good for driving at highway speed, so I put in another 5 psi for sitting-around duty. But definitely leave yourself a note on the driver's seat to remind you to adjust the pressure when you put it back on the road. You wouldn't want to drive on tires at those pressures!

I also put two layers of carpet remnants under each tire.

The Yoko LTS compound has a minimum temperature limit, which also applies to storage, so if you are in a cold climate and not storing the car in a heated garage, you should think about getting storage stands or some other tires. I use a set of Eagles.

Some people recommend starting up the car every month or so and letting the engine warm up. Those people are morons. There are not many things you could do that would be worse for your engine than that.
 

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Some people recommend starting up the car every month or so and letting the engine warm up. Those people are morons. There are not many things you could do that would be worse for your engine than that.
Disclaimer. I have never stored my vehicle for winter. I drive my cars year round.

However I doubt that starting it up once a month in winter would be a problem and it might make it easier to start in the spring.
 

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I have always been told to store the car with a full tank of fuel. The thinking is that in the cold the water vapor in the air will condense adding water into the fuel. With a full tank you have way less air to cause problems. Would it hurt not having a full tank, probably not but what's the worst that could happen having it full?
QUOTE]

I store with a low tank, sea foam and heated/dehumidified storage. No matter how well stabilized I won't chance having to burn a whole tank of old fuel out in a supercharged car. Of course you could always drain the tank in the spring and put in fresh fuel before driving.:)
 

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Full tank!
The logic behind it, you want to get as much air out as possible. Air contains water, and water is heavier than gas so it will goes to the bottom of the gas tank if it turns from gas to liquid form. It will then rust your tank over the time.
 

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Thanks. We have the exact same car. Where in WI are you? I lived in Madison until late 06...now I'm in Minneapolis.
Mike
Are you a LOON?
 

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General rule of thumb, store the car with a full tank, the fuel displaces moist air and minimizes condensation, as stated earlier. Sta-bil is readily available. Likewise, it's best to store the car with fresh oil. Used oils have moisture and acids that can corrode engine internals over time.

Also, make sure to keep a maintainer on the battery. NOT a trickle charger, but a maintainer that stops charging when the battery is fully charged.
Yup. Also the last fill-up in the fall is non-oxygenated gasoline. Not a problem for the Stag, of course, as I run non-oxy all the time in that.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
LOON??? Actually, I'm a displaced Chicagoan, but I like MN...still Blackhawks over Wild though.

I just filled up with 91 yesterday (very nervously, since I will not register until spring so I have no plates. I passed by a cop, but he must not have been looking.) I bought some stabilizer that I was going to add. What do you mean by non-oxygenated? Do you mean no ethanol addition? Either way, I guess I thought 91 octane would be good. As for the oil, I was told it has Mobil-1. I probably will not be able to change it this season, since I'll have to figure out a suitable ramp that will not bottom-out the front. Any suggestions?
Yup. Also the last fill-up in the fall is non-oxygenated gasoline. Not a problem for the Stag, of course, as I run non-oxy all the time in that.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
...oh, and I was planning to hook up my trickle charger. It claims to stop when fully charged. Isn't this the same as a maintainer? I've been keeping my Audi TT battery over the last few winters with this charger without issue. Of course, I hadn't been adding a stabilizer to the fuel, so what do I know.
Yup. Also the last fill-up in the fall is non-oxygenated gasoline. Not a problem for the Stag, of course, as I run non-oxy all the time in that.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Unfortunately, I will probably be starting it on and off over the winter because I have a three-car garage and four cars plus a woodshop. The Exige will have to step aside occasionally for my tablesaw.
No need to limit the tire pressure to 40. Check the sidewall for the max rated pressure. IIRC, the Yokos are good to 50. Whatever it is, the number is good for driving at highway speed, so I put in another 5 psi for sitting-around duty. But definitely leave yourself a note on the driver's seat to remind you to adjust the pressure when you put it back on the road. You wouldn't want to drive on tires at those pressures!

I also put two layers of carpet remnants under each tire.

The Yoko LTS compound has a minimum temperature limit, which also applies to storage, so if you are in a cold climate and not storing the car in a heated garage, you should think about getting storage stands or some other tires. I use a set of Eagles.

Some people recommend starting up the car every month or so and letting the engine warm up. Those people are morons. There are not many things you could do that would be worse for your engine than that.
 

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I will look for it. Otherwise, I only have the occasional drive to work to look forward to.
I'm in Oak Creek (near Milwaukee). This next summer you should watch the midwest region threads for drives. We have a big Chicago / Milwaukee crew who are quite active.
 

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Store it with a 100% full tank and change the oil before. Long term storage the tank should be 100% empty, siphon out what you can and then run it until the engine stops. If there is any gas in the tank it will collect water as the air reaches freezing and returns to stable temperatures. This water will then hydrolock your engine.
 

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Good to know guys. One thing, I thought modern sidewalls don't require overinflating tires when storing cars for the winter? Also, what if I just disconnect the battery and have it sit in the garage?
 

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However I doubt that starting it up once a month in winter would be a problem and it might make it easier to start in the spring.
Sounds like you're speculating. I'll counter-speculate that a series of cold starts followed by idling (which will not recharge the battery effectively) amount to a torture test for the battery. So the car would be harder to start in spring.

The bigger problem with cold starts is the moisture generated. In normal operation the moisture evaporates, but idling a car will not bring the temps up enough to drive away the water. Much of this moisture collects in the fuel and oil; some ends up in the combustion chambers, potentially corroding the cast iron piston rings. Water also ends up in the exhast system, where it sits and leads to rusting. We've all noticed how the muffler is the first part to rust out on an old car.

Cold starting also increases the acidity of the oil. This is a major cause of engine wear. A whole lot of the effort that goes into the design of the additive package is aimed at preventing acid buildup. But the chemistry is based on normal operation of the engine, not repeated idling periods.

Mechanical wear is also a problem. The great majority of mechanical wear in an engine occurs at startup. It's been estimated that the mechanical wear from a cold start is equivalent to the wear during 500 miles of running at normal operating temps. Why do it if you don't really need to?
 
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