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Yet another question that came to mind as I contemplate an Elise. I'm wondering about parts availability with regards to mechanical break downs, not collisions. Insurance can total a car and you get some of your money back.

These cars are mostly 05's and 06's. So they are old, and worse, quite rare. From what I understand today, parts are not a huge problem to get. There may be a delay to get some parts but you don't have to worry about not finding them. What about the future? Does anyone think about what the situation will be like 10 years forward? Is it possible that your beautiful Elise can be bricked due to no parts to fix them? I saw in another thread a person lost the ECU on their car. I tried looking around and today it seems used ones are the most common. That means new ones are hard or impossible to get. What about in 10 more years?

Thank you everyone for helping me make this big decision. My heart really wants a car like an Elise but I'm trying very hard to make sure it is the right decision long term.
 

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I don't see this as a problem. The engine and transaxle are Toyota. There are lots of aftermarket parts available. When it comes to the ECU, there are also aftermarket options, so if your ECU failed and you really couldn't find a replacement, you could swap in an aftermarket ECU.

If you're not a DIY kinda guy, something you probably should be more worried about is if there is any shops near you that know how to work on a Lotus.
 

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Doesn't this logic apply to some degree to any car? What if electrics take over and even the ubiquitous GM V8 becomes rare? Typewriters used to be common, too. You're overthinking it by a mile. For as long as there are car enthusiasts, there will be solutions to these sorts of problems. For instance, some connector seems to have been discontinued in the '05 engine harness, and the price is ten times the price of the '06 harness. However, any number of race shops can build a custom harness, so you'll never have a bricked Lotus because of it.
 

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Doesn't this logic apply to some degree to any car? What if electrics take over and even the ubiquitous GM V8 becomes rare? Typewriters used to be common, too. You're overthinking it by a mile. For as long as there are car enthusiasts, there will be solutions to these sorts of problems. For instance, some connector seems to have been discontinued in the '05 engine harness, and the price is ten times the price of the '06 harness. However, any number of race shops can build a custom harness, so you'll never have a bricked Lotus because of it.
Thank you for your response. I just dont know this stuff so have to ask these somewhat stupid questions.
 

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I bought my 2009 Elise not realizing how few had been sold nor how tiny a company Lotus was.

Had I known those things at that time I might not have purchased one.

However mine has been very reliable and I've mostly only needed Toyota parts. The few Lotus specific parts were available quite easily too via my dealer.

It is good to ask but I don't think you need to worry about parts.
 

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It's pretty easy to keep a 58 7, 61 Type 14 Elite, 66 Elan, 74 Europa, 93 Esprit in great shape, parts-wise. Modern Lotus will be fine, with the possible exception of clams.
 

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Clams from Lotus would be my one concern, who knows when they will stop making them
 

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this logic seems based on the assumption everyone buys new parts and no one wrecks cars.

As cars get older parts are more available as junker have them. Sure companies do not produce them but we are not talking about a million cars here. Also these are mostly Toyota parts. I just do not seem to follow the concern and agree it not a special case here.

Some of the lotus made parts are going to be harder to find if not at a junk yard yes. But that will not change on any special car so it goes with owning one.
 

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2005 Elise LSS Saffron Yellow
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I'm already gently stalking a Celica GT-S or Corolla XRS for a donor drivetrain. One reason is for parts for the Elise. The other is as a possible drivetrain swap for my gen 5 Celica (it looks very easy, except possibly for getting instruments to work).

A well-used Celica GS-S is available quite cheap compared to the price of an Elise. The ideal drivetrain donor car obviously would be rear-ended with low mileage, but that's pretty unlikely at this late date. In any event, the parts pool is a lot bigger for drivetrain parts than the Esprit folks can draw from - we're like the Seven and Elan people in this regard, except that we have the additional advantages that a) the 2ZZ-GE/C60 transmission is a lot commoner around the world than the UK Ford Essex engine ever was, and b) it's a lot sturdier design to begin with.

I am frankly not all that worried about fiberglass parts just disappearing one day. Fiberglass repair is not an especially exotic skill, and standard FG repair techniques work just fine on Elise body parts. In the case of a badly damaged clam that previously would have been replaced with a new part, you can do a partial mold from a good clam and make a 'repair panel' that can be spliced in to repair an otherwise unsalvageable clam. Because they were injection molded, so have pretty precise tolerances, 'FrankenClams' are also possible. All it takes is time and money, or more time and patience if you're doing it yourself.
 

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TERIB. I’ve read your questions. And I think it’s good to think ahead, but too much thinking can paralyze you. You should buy an Elise and quit worrying. Come on in, the water is great! ??
 

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There is also the Japanese Domestic Market (JDM) for engine and drivetrain parts. In Japan the tax on cars goes up significantly every year (pollution reasons) which forces them to get rid of their cars in 4 to 5 years. This tends to be about 40K miles. They chop the cars up and market the parts around the world. I have replaced an engine via a JDM dealer in Toronto. There are several here in the States.

We have several companies here in the States specializing in OEM and aftermarket parts for the Elise. Since these are still being sold in the UK they have several companies selling parts also and the shipping fees have not been too bad.

Don't worry about the parts yet.
 
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