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Integrator
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Discussion Starter #441
Cold Air Intake enlargement

CAI port at the RH scoop is too small.

It chokes the compressor at higher rpm and creates a pressure drop, which adversely affects turbo efficiency.
Fortunately, there is enough room behind the window for 40% enlargement.
 

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Integrator
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Discussion Starter #443
Accusump as a pre-luber

Worth installing a pre-lube pump to avoid "dry starts"! If good for Lambo, it's good got Esprit!

VARNA Products | EP-4 Prelube Pump ~ Prelube Pump, Soak Back Pump, for use on Large Engines, Integrated Check Valve.

Yeah, nice pump, but horrendously expensive ($825, yikes!).

Weldon pumps are very durable and 50% cheaper! MOCAL pumps cost under $200 on eBay (17-522HT or similar, DD required).


Notice the start/cranking sequence on this Lambo (12-15 sec delay for pre luber to pressurize the engine oiling system):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6ubbarez-A
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In addition to the above, one may decide to use Accusump pressure cylinder with a NC solenoid valve.
If wired to the ignition, it'll function as a pre-luber and a pressure stabilizer.

How does it work?
 

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In your third photo, that brass fitting above the solenoid valve, with a ring in it, is a pressure relief valve...on the oil side of the Accusump! It is there for a reason. You do get oil pressure spikes that need to be relieved to protect the integrity of the Accusump. Those holes on the sides of the pressure relief valve is where oil is dumped out of! You have your Accusump mounted in your trunk. That time or two that oil pressure gets relieved, will be in your trunk...are you sure you want it that way?

The other thing is that ring. By pulling on that ring, you can manually relieve the oil pressure from the Accusump...into your trunk! I have snagged that ring by junk in the trunk. It makes a frightful mess of everything in the trunk...and you've got yours carpeted. Think real hard and long about those two points.

You have also posted Morroso's MARKETING video about how an oil accumulator works. So, they want to paint a rosy picture entice you to buy them. But now think about how pressure works. It goes to the place with the least resistance. If you use the accumulator as a pre-oiler, what happens when the engine just starts? You've got a "fire hose" (AN-10 line), feeding oil to your whole engine...you need that in that direction. But once the engine lights, oil goes right back into the accumulator through that low restriction "fire hose" to replenish it with oil and NOT oil the engine. That's why real sharp engine builders of super high end engines shy away from them.

Just food for thought...
 

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Integrator
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Discussion Starter #445 (Edited)
Sig,

Thank you for your comments.

I was wondering about usefulness of this pressure relief valve. Canton states the valve is "very reliable" and calibrated to open at 175 psi, which is well above the pressure the unit would see. To be on the safe side, I may eliminate it and put a solid plug instead.
Except, they say, removal voids warranty.

The ring will go - that's for sure. Good point. I may add some cover at the later time.

I posted Moroso video for illustration only.

At the port of the cylinder, there is a NC1 solenoid valve, which is energized when the ignition key is in "ON" position. V+ is fed to this solenoid via a relay controlled by a timer, which brakes the electrical circuit feed upon turning the key to "crank" position and it "holds" for 15-60 sec preventing Accusump from being re-filled until engine pressure rises/stabilizes. It also closes relay NO1 preventing Turbo after-oilier from
robbing pressure from the main galley.
 

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OK...very good that you have addressed the straight through connection to the accumulator all worked out. It sounds reasonable too.

As far as the pressure relief valve goes, the one situation that I can think of right off the bat is that you loose air pressure out of the back side of your accumulator. Either the Schrader valve leaks or the pressure gauge leaks and lets all of the air out. Oil is filled to the max and the piston is hard up against the back wall...then the solenoid valve is snapped shut. You can easily spike several hundred PSI in that condition.

I was thinking of running an AN-3 or -4 line to a catch can or the top of an oil dry sump tank with a bulkhead fitting and then mounting that pressure relief valve on the inside of the tank. I just hadn't gotten that far to figure it all out yet.

Good work though...
 

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Illegal Alien
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I question a number of this modifications related to "luxury", This thread is for the X180 a car focused on homologating a race car.
 

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I question a number of this modifications related to "luxury", This thread is for the X180 a car focused on homologating a race car.
X180 was the designation for the '88 Esprit Turbo, specifically the Peter Steven redesign. MRDANGERUS has an '88.
X180-R was the street legal version of the '91 Esprit, Type 105. The Racecars were Type 106.
 

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Integrator
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Discussion Starter #451 (Edited)
Esprit Power Robbing Fuel Temperature Raise

FYI:

Dave ("Changes" from UK, 1990 SE), experienced/researched the fuel temperature raise problem and provided solutions. In my opinion, this applies to ALL MY Esprits.

I have tried to address this problem in my tank fabrication thread: http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f164/x180-esprit-turbo-fuel-tanks-diy-265762/


Here is how Dave discovered he has a problem, see page 6 of this thread: https://www.thelotusforums.com/forums/topic/42263-412-bhpthat-will-do-nicely/?page=6
And continued on page 9
https://www.thelotusforums.com/forums/topic/42263-412-bhpthat-will-do-nicely/?page=9


The fuel circulating in the Esprit system will rise in temp from ambient. The layout does little to suppress it. The lower the fuel level gets the hotter it gets, which in hot countries on low fuel will cause performance irregularities. During the changes I made we addressed fuel supply requirements for the higher BHP levels. Doing this exposed just how hot the fuel could reach, In my case we had it boiling in the swirl pot.. Hence the introduction of the fuel cooler which is detailed somewhere. All of this is of little interest to those with basic tuning but the fringe studies will be.

When studying the re circulation of the fueling system in std form , the o/s tank ran several degrees hotter than the n/s. We also exposed that the fuel on the tank exit pipe was also considerably hotter than the ambient tank temp.. ( These are average figures over varying times and conditions. ) Prior to the fuel cooler I installed a ram air circulation system around the tanks to try and reduce the temp rise. I simply did this by forming a ram duct under the tank over the circa 3'' hole in the body which already there. This did have a slight effect but was limited to vehicles speed and use. However even though the tank temp stabilized slightly the exit pipe temp showed very little reduction .. I guess the ram system was not able to drop the tank temp sufficiently to have an appreciable effect. The next step was the fuel return. this was in effect the heat source.. It was directly next to the pick up which is why the exit pipe temp was higher than the tank temp, along with any increase from any pump function. So I then redirected this into the n/s tank . This had the most dramatic effect. What we saw was the n/s tank hotter than the o/s , a reversal from before , more interestingly only by a small margin.. The tank exit pipe temp now dropped to the same as the o/s tank which was also considerably cooler than before. The fuel temperature rise in the tanks was so much slower than before, to begin with I thought along with the ram air cooler I had cracked it, but alas over longer journeys the temp rose especially in traffic. This never reached the temps I had seen previous but still had higher readings on lower fuel levels.

Lower fuel temps can increase performance by helping the VE and having a more consistent fueling delivery. The standard ECU does not have fuel temp monitoring system so will deliver the same pulse of fuel regardless. When the fuel is hotter it is less dense so less is injected.. The amounts we are talking about are minuscule and will not be really noticeable on a daily drive. But as part of a tuning package all these small percentages add up to make a huge effect as this thread will testify.

So in brief does ram air tank cooling work , in a fashion yes.. ( there is a few other points that need be considered, that are not mentioned if thinking of undertaking, along with more effect ways of doing. )

Hope that clears any area's that may have been missed..

Dave..
 

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Dreaded Prior Owner
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Switching the return tank looks like the most significant measure with fuller tanks, although you're always going to have the engine between the fuel tanks effect over time.
I wonder what the churning effects of oversize and dual fuel pumps has on temp rise. Perhaps a electrically controlled pump similar to the returnless systems that could be sized for peak HP, but run at lower flows for cruising loads with less energy going into forcing excess fuel through the regulator and hot piping?
 

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Project Addicted
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372 Posts
This reminds me of the old Splitfire spark plugs that was snake oil:

SplitFire spark plugs were popular and heavily advertised in the early 1990s. The manufacturer also sponsored the SplitFire Spark Plug 500 NASCAR stock car race, the SplitFire 200, various other powersports, and the Pro Bowlers Association SplitFire Spark Plug Open.[1]
In 1997, the United States Federal Trade Commission charged SplitFire with deceptive advertising. The manufacturer settled the charges with the FTC; as part of the settlement, SplitFire was prohibited from making what the FTC considered deceptive claims about fuel economy or emissions.[2] After the settlement, the popularity of SplitFire's spark plug range declined; in 2002, they were still considered a leading sparkplug manufacturer[3] by 2015, the company's products were mostly gone from shelves and the official website had been removed.
 

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Integrator
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2,740 Posts
Discussion Starter #456 (Edited)
I'm not saying it is a snake oil. I have a set on my other car (V8 N/A, EFI) and they work as advertised and they come with 100K miles/5year warranty.
I'm wondering how e3-s perform on a turbocharged high redline engine. I guess, there is only one way to find out, LOL. It is easy to change plugs on 910 engines.
 

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Integrator
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2,740 Posts
Discussion Starter #460
Beware of the Silicone vacuum hoses!
They look pretty and are "cool", BUT, if there is ANY amount of oil on the inside/outside, they deteriorate fast and turn into a mushy soft gooey substance. NG!

Search for Nitrile rubber fuel lines or just "fuel line" of the desired internal diameter.
And yes, you can buy as small as 3mm ID hoses/lines on eBay or NAPA.
 
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