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Your Ride Is Here gives cancer patients a lift with exotic cars | Fox News

When Ken Adams was fighting cancer, it wasn’t the treatments that he struggled with most. It was the fact that he had to watch his fellow patients waiting for hours and hours at a bus stop to be picked up after treatment.

“When I was in treatment, I wanted to go home right away. People that rode the bus, they had to sit a while,” says Adams. “Sometimes people were sitting waiting when I got there and still waiting when I would leave.”

Suffering from Stage 3 head and neck cancer, Adams was getting chemotherapy every Monday for eight weeks and radiation treatments every day for 39 days. During one of the toughest times in his life, there was one thing that kept him excited.

“I love cars and I loved driving different cars to treatment,” says the 48-year-old Lotus owner.

In 2010, he put his passion to good use, founding Your Ride Is Here, a non-profit organization that provides rides for cancer patients to their treatment appointments.

“When I first started the program, I thought we would have a few rides here and there,” says Adams, but the Austin-based organization has since provided more than 400 rides in the past two years.

“We picked someone up in a $350,000 Rolls Royce,” says Sonny Morgan, owner of John Eagle European, a high-end car dealer in Austin that sells Rolls Royce, Bentley and Aston Martin cars.

“We picked up one woman in an Aston Martin and all she could talk about was how fun it was,” Morgan recalls. “There’s a difference between getting picked up in that and going to a bus stop to get zapped.”

“We talked about what kind of car I would have if money was no object,” says Elizabeth Amsler, who is dealing with ovarian cancer and got a lift in one of Morgan’s cars. “That afternoon, he came back in an Aston Martin!”

Through Adams’ own cancer treatment and Morgan’s family members who have had to deal with cancer, they both knew that getting around on your own is not an option for many patients.

“Even if people have a car in their garage, they are too weak to drive it,” says Morgan.

“Patients have to ask friends and family to take off work to drive them, and sometimes people don’t have someone they can ask,” says Adams. Add the rapidly rising gas prices to the equation, and that is when people simply give up.
“People skip chemo and say ‘I’m just going to skip it,’” says Morgan.
So far, Your Ride is Here has never had to turn a patient away who needed a ride, and has more than 200 volunteers around Austin who use one of Morgan’s cars, or often their own exotic cars.

“If someone is going into town, why not take someone with you who needs to get to treatment?” says Adams.

When a patient gets picked up in a dream car, the focus quickly shifts from cancer to fun, says Adams. “Instead of talking about treatment and cancer, we talk about the car. It really changes the mindset of the patient.”

“I would let them know what my next appointment was and they would just show up. It was easy. That left me to spend my energy on important things… like getting better,” Amsler adds.

The organization has no paid employees, but is working to expand out of Austin and onto the nationwide scene.

“At the end of the day,” Adams says, “if everyone across the United States didn’t have to worry about a ride to treatment, that would be awesome.”
Your Ride Is Here


What an awesome thing to do! :clap: :up: Is he a member here?
 

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Outstanding idea. I'm sure any patient would love to 'get away' from their thoughts on what their going through. And what a way to do it.
Unfortunately our cars really aren't too accessible when it comes to wheel chairs, getting in or out, or people with mobility issues. We'd have to treat this right to make sure we don't hurt them anymore than they are already. It would depend on where on their body they're dealing with their problem.
I'd be up for it. Although I'm in a fairly remote area and in Canada.
Buddy in the Ferrari needs a shift light or needs to pay attention more the way he redlined it a couple times. Woulda sucked if he hit the other one in the end of the vid as he did the 360 right in front of it.
Cheers to the founder and the volunteers.
 

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I signed up. I hope the consider the suitability of the Elise given its ingress/egress difficulties when matching with patients.
 

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I have been watching that site for awhile, and almost posted it here a few weeks back. Only thing holding me back is a) I'm about to move again and b) right now it seems like they only have agreements with local hospitals in TX..not sure what would go into starting a program in other cities, but once I get back to (hopefully) Tampa by springtime I plan on looking into doing it.

It is a great program with awesome intentions
 

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What a great idea! On a similar note, I wonder if it might be feasible to organize track days at a local facility and offer rides or shared driving experiences to people fighting cancer.

For instance, I'd be thrilled to share my car on a lapping session at a place like Road America - not far from where I live. We could do anything from giving rides for kids to letting qualified adults take the wheel.

I happen to be an oncology representative for a major pharmaceutical company who works closely with area cancer centers on a daily basis. I have so much respect for people living with cancer and I'd love to find a way to share my love for sports cars with these patients.

This really has me thinking...:popcorn:
 

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As a recent neck cancer patient (in 2007), I LOVE this idea. I am currently driving my car up through the US (leave Seattle to head north to Alaska on 1st May) but will eventually go back to Australia with my car and might look at doing something like that there. There was a fellow patient going through at the same time as me, and it was only at the end that I learned he a) lived not far away from me and b) took all day to get to the hospital and back by public transport. I was so upset when I found out.
Top idea, although I think a little more comfort than an Elise might be appreciated !! I didn't drive mine for almost a year during my treatment. But it depends on the type of cancer and the type of treatment. I was so sick I didn't want to do anything much at all, but others with a less aggressive cancer or treatment programme who might be feeling a bit better would really enjoy somethng like that.
Giles
 
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